GENEVA, June 14 – The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has circulated the Final Draft including the Summary for Policymakers (SPM) of the Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate (SROCC) to governments in the final stage of preparation before the IPCC considers the report for approval in September.

The report assesses the latest scientific literature addressing climate change and the ocean and the cryosphere – water in its solid state such as glaciers and ice sheets. It will add to knowledge on a range of topics from water supplies for people living in high-mountain areas to the risks of sea-level rise for coastal communities as well as other climate-related changes in the two systems that all people on Earth depend upon directly or indirectly.

“This report will provide valuable information about how climate change is affecting ocean, coastal, polar and mountain ecosystems,” said Hans-Otto Pörtner, Co-Chair of IPCC Working Group II. “It will also discuss how nature and society can respond to the risks this poses and achieve climate-resilient development.”

IPCC member governments are invited to submit comments on the Summary for Policymakers of the report to the IPCC from 14 June to 9 August. The IPCC will consider the Summary for Policymakers line by line at an approval session in Monaco from 20-23 September. Subject to approval, the report will be launched at a live-streamed press conference in Monaco on 25 September at 10:00 local time.

For more information contact:

IPCC Press Office, Email: ipcc-media@wmo.int Twitter: @IPCC_CH

Jonathan Lynn, +41 22 730 8066 or Werani Zabula, +41 22 730 8120

 

IPCC Working Group II Technical Support Unit:

Maike Nicolai, +49 471 4831 2445, Email: maike.nicolai@ipcc-wg2.awi.de, Twitter: @NicolaiM

 

Notes for editors

About SROCC

For the IPCC Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate (SROCC), more than 100 scientists from more than 30 countries are assessing the latest scientific knowledge about the physical science basis and impacts of climate change on ocean, coastal, polar and mountain ecosystems, and the human communities that depend on them. Their vulnerabilities as well as adaptation capacities are also evaluated. Options for achieving climate-resilient development pathways will be presented. The SROCC is prepared under the joint scientific leadership of Working Group I and Working Group II, with operational support from the Working Group II Technical Support Unit. It will be launched in September 2019.

Report web page: https://www.ipcc.ch/report/srocc


About the IPCC

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is the UN body for assessing the science related to climate change. It was established by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in 1988 to provide political leaders with periodic scientific assessments concerning climate change, its implications and risks, as well as to put forward adaptation and mitigation strategies. It has 195 member states.

The IPCC has three working groups: Working Group I, dealing with the physical science basis of climate change; Working Group I, dealing with impacts, adaptation and vulnerability; and Working Group III, dealing with the mitigation of climate change. It also has a Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories that develops methodologies for measuring emissions and removals.

Comprehensive scientific assessment reports are published every six to seven years; the latest, the Fifth Assessment Report, was completed in 2014. The next comprehensive assessment is due to be completed in 2022. The IPCC also publishes special reports on more specific issues between assessment reports.

In addition to the Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate, the current Sixth Assessment Cycle includes two more Special Reports:

In May 2019, the IPCC also finalized the 2019 Refinement to the 2006 IPCC Guidelines on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories.

The contributions of the three IPCC Working Groups to the Sixth Assessment Report will be finalized in 2021. The concluding Synthesis Report is due in 2022.

For more information visit www.ipcc.ch.

Working Group I of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change is recruiting the

Head of Science in the Technical Support Unit (IPCC WGI)

for the IPCC Working Group I Sixth Assessment Report (AR6). The position is located at the University of Paris-Saclay (France).

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)

The IPCC was established by the United Nations Environment Programme (UN Environment) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in 1988 to provide policymakers with rigorous, transparent, and objective scientific assessments on climate change, its implications and potential future risks, as well as to put forward adaptation and mitigation options. The IPCC is now undertaking its Sixth Assessment (AR6) cycle. The IPCC Working Group I (WGI) assesses the physical science underpinning past, present, and future climate change. The WGI Technical Support Unit (TSU) provides scientific, technical, operational and communications support that underpin and implement the WGI assessment.

The Technical Support Unit (TSU)

The TSU works at the unique IPCC interface between science and policy in the provision of the climate knowledge and information that is relevant for policy needs and decision making. The team is responsible for facilitating and implementing the assessment process undertaken by the author teams and overseen by the WGI Bureau. We are seeking someone who is highly motivated to join a team that spans different areas of expertise including climate sciences (observations, climate processes, global and regional climate modeling), visual design and communication, digital information development and management, and international project management.

The Head of Science Role

We seek candidates that bring a broad understanding of state-of-the-art climate science, international research and coordinated activities, as well as demonstrated experience in team leadership and management. We are looking for someone who is enthusiastic in supporting a high impact and rigorous WGI assessment and promote the value of information on the physical basis of climate change and its accessibility and usability by different communities around the world. Within the AR6, the IPCC has also implemented coordination mechanisms to facilitate handshakes between each Working Group on the exchange of climate knowledge and information for the assessment of impacts, risk and mitigation. This position is a remarkable opportunity to make a significant contribution to informed decision making and climate-related policy development across multiple scales and different communities.

Duties and responsibilities

The Head of Science will be responsible for the delivery and coordination of science-related activities of the Technical Support Unit (TSU) throughout the preparation, review and completion phases of the report of WGI that will be published in 2021. The successful candidate will support the work of the AR6 authors, working closely with the WGI Bureau, they will report to the Head of TSU and the Co-Chairs of WGI.

The Head of Science will play a leading role within the TSU in supporting the development of the assessment, the preparation of the Technical Summary and the Summary for Policymakers, and the synthesis of the assessment findings therein, as well as in the contribution of WGI assessment to the cross-Working Group AR6 Synthesis Report. As Head of the TSU Science Team, the successful candidate will contribute to the overall management and coordination of the full breath of TSU activities in close collaboration with the Head of TSU and Head of Operations.

The TSU Science Team is comprised of Senior Science Officers and Science Officers at the post-doctoral level. It has a distributed structure with staff based at the TSU office at the Universit. Paris Saclay and at the Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences in Beijing, China. The Head of Science will lead the team, linemanage the Paris-based Science Team, as well as coordinate work done in collaboration with the members based in Beijing. The role will also include mentoring and supervision of projects undertaken with students and interns on science and science-policy analysis.

The Science Team supports the assessment, the robustness, traceability and confidence of the assessment findings based on multiple lines of evidence. The team works on the consistent treatment of climate science topics within the Working Group I report and in relation to the wider AR6 assessment (including Special Reports released in 2018 and 2019 and the other Working Group reports), identifying emerging policy relevant topics, coordinating cross-cutting themes for the successful preparation of the report. The team also supports the author teams in terms of assessed digital information accessibility, reproducibility and curation for the transparency and provenance of the assessment outcomes, fostering open source community practices, data literacy and management.

The Head of Science will be active in consultation, outreach and communication activities of WGI, representing the work of the TSU, Bureau and the assessment of WGI in national and international fora, fostering and maintaining close contact with the IPCC broader scientific and stakeholder communities, also in liaison with WGs II and III of the IPCC.

Requirements:

Attributes

Application

The position is through to May 2022, with the possibility for extension through the completion of the project. We seek availability to start as soon as possible, including availability to participate at the next Lead Author Meeting the week of the 26th August 2019.

Please send by July 5th, 2019, your application consisting of a letter of motivation, curriculum vitae, and contact details of two referees, to Dr. Anna Pirani (anna.pirani@universite-paris-saclay.fr), Head of the WGI TSU.

Job Summary:
The Centre for Environmental Policy wishes to appoint a Research Fellow as a Senior Scientist within the Technical Support Unit (TSU) of Working Group III of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). WG III is concerned with the mitigation of climate change and the TSU will be based at the South Kensington Campus.

Salary: £42,654 – £52,908 per annum

Location: Imperial College,South Kensington Campus, London

Duties and responsibilities:
The Research Fellow will play an essential role in ensuring WG III scientific reports and documents meet the needs of the global policy community by helping Lead Authors critically evaluate the current evidence around climate change mitigation. We are looking for someone familiar with the modelling of climate mitigation responses. You will be expected to keep abreast of key developments in this field and be able to contribute technical and editorial expertise in support of the author teams.

You will also have a critical role in managing the process by which IPPC reports are delivered, working with Lead Authors from around the world to ensure the integrity, policy relevance, and timely delivery of WG III outputs.

Essential requirements:
You will have a PhD (or equivalent) in a discipline relevant to climate change mitigation (e.g. economics, engineering or systems research). The postholder is expected to have experience in a field relevant to climate change mitigation, reflected in a growing national reputation, as well as demonstrated success in delivering research results.

Further Information:
This post is funded by The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) and is offered as a full-time, fixed-term position until 31 March 2020, with the expectation of an extension subject to confirmation of funding.

Should you require any further details on the role please contact: Professor Jim Skea  j.skea@ipcc-wg3.ac.uk

For technical issues when applying online please email recruitment@imperial.ac.uk

The College is a proud signatory to the San-Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA), which means that in hiring and promotion decisions, we evaluate applicants on the quality of their work, not the journal impact factor where it is published. For more information, see https://www.imperial.ac.uk/research-and-innovation/about-imperial-research/research-evaluation/

The College believes that the use of animals in research is vital to improve human and animal health and welfare. Animals may only be used in research programmes where their use is shown to be necessary for developing new treatments and making medical advances. Imperial is committed to ensuring that, in cases where this research is deemed essential, all animals in the College’s care are treated with full respect, and that all staff involved with this work show due consideration at every level.

http://www.imperial.ac.uk/research-and-innovation/about-imperial-research/research-integrity/animal-research/

Imperial College is committed to equality of opportunity, to eliminating discrimination and to creating an inclusive working environment. We are an Athena SWAN Silver award winner, a Stonewall Diversity Champion, a Disability Confident Employer and work in partnership with GIRES to promote respect for trans people.

Closing date: 3-July-2019

To apply, visit www.imperial.ac.uk/jobs and search by the job reference NAT00472.

About Imperial College London

Imperial College London is the UK’s only university focused entirely on science, engineering, medicine and business and we are consistently rated in the top 10 universities in the world.

You will find our main London campus in South Kensington, with our hospital campuses located nearby in West and North London. We also have Silwood Park in Berkshire and state-of-the-art facilities in development at our major new campus in White City.

We work in a multidisciplinary and diverse community for education, research, translation and commercialisation, harnessing science and innovation to tackle the big global challenges our complex world faces.

It is our mission to achieve enduring excellence in all that we do for the benefit of society – and we are looking for the most talented people to help us get there.

Additional information

Please note that job descriptions cannot be exhaustive and the post-holder may be required to undertake other duties, which are broadly in line with the above key responsibilities.

All Imperial employees are expected to follow the 7 principles of Imperial Expectations:

In addition to the above, employees are required to observe and comply with all College policies and regulations.

Imperial College is committed to equality of opportunity, to eliminating discrimination and to creating an inclusive working environment. We are an Athena SWAN Silver award winner, a Stonewall Diversity Champion, a Disability Confident Employer and work in partnership with GIRES to promote respect for trans people.

It is with deep sorrow that the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has learnt of the death of the Agronomic Engineer, Sergio Patricio Emanuel González, who passed away on 18  May 2019, aged 73.

Sergio González contributed significantly to the work of the IPCC, especially to the Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories (TFI)

He was a member of the Task Force Bureau during the Fourth and Fifth Assessment cycle. During this period he was a Review Editor of IPCC special reports and a Lead Author of the Chapter 4 of the 2006 IPCC  Guidelines on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories. He was also  a member of the Editorial Board of the IPCC Emission Factors Database.

Sergio’s research interest was in land use, land-use change and forestry issues of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). He was an instructor for the “Agriculture” Sector, in UNFCCC training courses directed to greenhouse gases inventories elaborators and reviewers and he was also Lead-Reviewer of national greenhouse gases inventories submitted by the Annex I parties to the UNFCCC.

He was the author of numerous articles published in scientific journals including Turrialba, Chilean Journal of Agriculture (Chile), Agricultural Science and Research (Chile), Simiente (Chile), Archivos de Medicina Veterinaria (Chile), Veterinarian and Human Toxicology (USA), Water, Air and Soil Pollution (USA), Biogeochemistry of Trace Metals (USA) and Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (USA).

He also authored and edited the book “Bromuro de Metilo, un Fumigante en retirada” (INIA-UNDP).

Note: Deadline for applications was 27 May 2019

The African Climate and Development Initiative (ACDI) wishes to appoint two Postdoctoral Research Fellows (PDRF) to act as Chapter Scientists for the IPCC AR6 Chapter 9 “Africa Climate Change Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability” and Chapter 17 “Decision-Making Options for Managing Risk”.

The primary role of a Chapter Scientist is to provide technical support to one of the IPCC Report chapters. The responsibilities of the Chapter Scientists are to an author team, not to an individual of an author team. The Coordinating Lead Authors (CLAs) of each chapter, in consultation with their author team and the Working Group II Technical Support Unit, define the specific tasks to be executed by each Chapter Scientist. This can involve a wide range of support tasks, including literature review, contributing text to the chapter, figure drafting, reference checking and compilation, traceability checking, identification of overlaps or inconsistencies across chapters, and technical editing, facilitating communication between the author team, organization of chapter teleconferences.  The Chapter Scientist will need to be available to attend all relevant Lead Author Meetings (LAMs).

Being a Chapter Scientist is an excellent opportunity for early-career researchers to participate in the IPCC process.  Attendance at the IPCC author meetings are an excellent opportunity to meet and work with a diverse set of high-profile scientists from multiple countries. The Chapter Scientist will also be encouraged and supported to produce research and/or policy publications aligned with the broader goals of the chapter they support.

The positions are open to recent PhD and Masters graduates in a field of study relevant to each Chapter.

The scientists will be directly supervised by Dr Chris Trisos (CLA, Chapter 9) and Prof Mark New (CLA, Chapter 17) on behalf of each Chapter’s CLAs and LAs.

Application deadline: 27 May 2019

For more details on each position, and how to apply, please visit: http://www.acdi.uct.ac.za/acdi/opportunities.

KYOTO, Japan, May 13 – The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released on Monday an update to its methodology used by governments to estimate their greenhouse gas emissions and removals.

Governments are required to report their national greenhouse gas inventories — comprising estimates of greenhouse gas emissions and removals — to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) including under processes such as the Kyoto Protocol and Paris Agreement.

The updated IPCC methodology improves this transparency and reporting process by ensuring that the methodology used to determine these inventories is based on the latest science.

The new report, the 2019 Refinement to the 2006 IPCC Guidelines on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories (2019 Refinement), was prepared by the IPCC’s Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories (TFI). A plenary session of the IPCC Panel in Kyoto, Japan, adopted the report’s Overview Chapter and accepted the main report.

“The 2019 Refinement provides an updated and sound scientific basis for supporting the preparation and continuous improvement of national greenhouse gas inventories,” said Kiyoto Tanabe, Co-Chair of the TFI.

The 2019 Refinement provides supplementary methodologies to estimate sources that produce emissions of greenhouse gases and sinks that absorb these gases. It also addresses gaps in the science that were identified, new technologies and production processes have emerged, or for sources and sinks that were not included in the 2006 IPCC Guidelines.

It also provides updated values of some emission factors used to link the emission of a greenhouse gas for a particular source to the amount of activity causing the emission. Updates are provided where authors identified significant differences from values in the 2006 IPCC Guidelines.

Over 280 scientists and experts worked on the 2019 Refinement to produce many changes to the general guidance as well as methodologies for four sectors: energy; industrial processes and product use; agriculture, forestry and other land use; and waste.

“Our authors have examined a wide range of inventory methodologies and updated them where scientific advances and new knowledge made this necessary, following the IPCC decision,” said Eduardo Calvo, Co-Chair of the TFI.

The 2006 IPCC Guidelines continue to provide a technically sound methodological basis for measuring national greenhouse gas inventories. The 2019 Refinement updates, supplements and elaborates them where the authors identified gaps or out-of-date science. The 2019 Refinement is to be used in conjunction with the 2006 IPCC Guidelines.

The meeting of the UNFCCC’s subsidiary bodies in June 2019 will provide a first opportunity for Governments in the UNFCCC to receive and review the updated methodology, and determine the best pathway towards implementing the 2019 Refinement.

“The 2019 Refinement is to provide an updated scientific basis for supporting the preparation of national greenhouse gas inventories. I would like to thank the authors of the 2019 Refinement for their dedication and diligent work updating this methodology, which provides transparency that is vital to international efforts addressing dangerous climate change,” said IPCC Chair Hoesung Lee.

The IPCC’s 49th Session in Kyoto also transacted other business, including consideration of a report from the IPCC Task Group on Gender.

For more information contact:
IPCC Press Office, Email: ipcc-media@wmo.int

 

Notes for Editors

About the IPCC

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is the UN body for assessing the science related to climate change. It was established by the United Nations Environment Programme (UN Environment) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in 1988 to provide policymakers with regular scientific assessments concerning climate change, its implications and potential future risks, and to put forward adaptation and mitigation strategies. It has 195 member states.

IPCC assessments provide governments, at all levels, with scientific information that they can use to develop climate policies. IPCC assessments are a key input into the international negotiations to tackle climate change. IPCC reports are drafted and reviewed in several stages, thus guaranteeing objectivity and transparency.

The IPCC assesses the thousands of scientific papers published each year to inform policymakers about the state of knowledge on climate change. The IPCC identifies where there is agreement in the scientific community, where there are differences and where further research is needed. It does not conduct its own research.

To produce its reports, the IPCC mobilizes hundreds of scientists. These scientists and officials are drawn from diverse backgrounds. Only a dozen permanent staff work in the IPCC’s Secretariat.

The IPCC has three working groups: Working Group I (the physical science basis of climate change); Working Group II (impacts, adaptation and vulnerability); and Working Group III (mitigation of climate change). It also has a Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories that develops methodologies for estimating anthropogenic emissions and removals of greenhouse gases. All of these are supported by Technical Support Units guiding the production of IPCC assessment reports and other products.

IPCC Assessment Reports consist of contributions from each of the three working groups and a Synthesis Report. Special Reports undertake a shorter assessment of specific cross-disciplinary issues that usually span more than one working group.

IPCC Methodologies
Greenhouse gases are gases in the atmosphere such as water vapour, carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide that can absorb infrared radiation, trapping heat in the atmosphere. This greenhouse effect means that emissions of greenhouse gases due to human activity cause global warming.

IPCC assessments have found that in scenarios addressing climate change, emissions of greenhouse gases fall sharply, and governments have agreed that such emissions should peak and fall rapidly. These agreements require information about participating countries’ net emissions – emissions less removals.

Emissions can arise from different activities such as burning fuel for energy, industrial processes, some farm activities and deforestation. Greenhouse gas emissions can also be removed from the atmosphere by trees and other plants and by industrial carbon dioxide removal techniques.

The IPCC’s Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories (TFI) develops and refines an internationally agreed methodology and software for the calculation and reporting of national greenhouse gas emissions and removals, and encourages the use of this methodology by countries participating in the IPCC and by Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

Parties to the UNFCCC regularly report greenhouse gas emissions and removals to the UNFCCC. By communicating information on greenhouse gas emissions and actions to reduce them, this transparency and reporting system helps Parties understand ambition and progress on climate action.

This methodology includes the formulation of emission factors used to link the emission of a greenhouse gas for a particular source to the amount of activity causing the emission.

The TFI has produced several methodology reports, starting with a set of guidelines in 1994. These were replaced by the Revised 1996 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories.

 The current methodology is the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories. This has been supplemented with the 2013 Revised Supplementary Methods and Good Practice Guidance Arising from the Kyoto Protocol and the 2013 Supplement to the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories: Wetlands.

A full list of IPCC Methodology Reports can be found here.

 

2019 Refinement
In August 2014 the Bureau of the TFI (TFB) concluded that the 2006 IPCC Guidelines provide a technically sound methodological basis of national greenhouse gas inventories. However, to maintain their scientific validity, certain refinements might be required, taking into account scientific and other technical advances that had matured sufficiently since 2006.

Following the conclusions by the TFB, the TFI carried out a technical assessment of IPCC inventory guidelines through an on-line questionnaire survey and four expert meetings in 2015 and 2016.

This assessment showed that there had been abundant new scientific and empirical knowledge published since 2006, which the IPCC should take into account, particularly with respect to data for emission factor development for some categories and gases.

At its 43rd Session in April 2016, the Panel decided to update its methodologies through a refinement of the 2006 IPCC Guidelines in order to assist all UNFCCC Parties in the preparation and continuous improvement of their national greenhouse gas inventories by ensuring they are supported by the best and latest available science.

A scoping meeting for the Methodology Report was held in August 2016.

At its 44th Session in October 2016, the Panel agreed to the outline of the 2019 Refinement to the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories, consisting of a single Methodology Report comprising an Overview Chapter and five volumes following the format of the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories.

The 2019 Refinement covers all IPCC inventory sectors but refinements are included for only those categories where the science was considered to have sufficiently advanced since 2006 or where new or additional guidance was required.

The 2019 Refinement was prepared by over 280 scientists and experts from 47 countries.

 

About the Sixth Assessment Cycle

At its 41st Session in February 2015, the IPCC decided to produce a Sixth Assessment Report (AR6). At its 42nd Session in October 2015 it elected a new Bureau that would oversee the work on this report and Special Reports to be produced in the assessment cycle.

In its decision on the adoption of the Paris Agreement, the Conference of Parties (COP) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) invited the IPCC to provide a special report in 2018 on the impacts of global warming of 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways. At its 43rd Session in April 2016, the IPCC accepted the invitation from the UNFCCC and  decided to produce two other Special Reports, a Methodology Report and the AR6.

Global Warming of 1.5°C, An IPCC special report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways, in the context of strengthening the global response to the threat of climate change, sustainable development, and efforts to eradicate poverty was released on 8 October 2018.

Besides the 2019 Refinement, the IPCC will finalize two Special Reports in 2019:

The three working group contributions to AR6 will be released in 2021, and the AR6 Synthesis Report will be finalized in the first half of 2022.

For more information go to www.ipcc.ch

 

KYOTO, Japan, May 10 – The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) will hold a press conference in Kyoto, Japan, on Monday 13 May 2019, following the 49th Session of the Panel which is due to end on 12 May.

The press conference, which will start at 10:00 a.m. Japan time (21:00 New York/EDT (12 May), 01:00 GMT, 03:00 Geneva/CEST), will be live-streamed at www.youtube.com/IPCCGeneva or www.facebook.com/IPCC.

The press conference is taking place at the Grand Prince Hotel Kyoto, 1092-2 Iwakura Hataedacho, Sakyo Ward, Kyoto 606-8505.

Media representatives not attending the press conference in person can submit questions remotely though www.sli.do entering the event code P-49 on the sli.do page.

The press conference will be in two parts. In the first part IPCC Chair Hoesung Lee and other senior officers will take questions on the outcomes of the 49th Session, the IPCC work programme and forthcoming reports, and other matters.

In the second part of the press conference, the Co-Chairs of the Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories, Eduardo Calvo Buendía and Kiyoto Tanabe, will present the methodology report 2019 Refinement to the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories, which is being considered by the Panel, subject to adoption and acceptance of the report.

Media representatives must register to attend the press conference in person and/or to access the adopted Overview Chapter of the 2019 Refinement and press release under embargo. Registration details are in this media advisory.

The IPCC expects to make embargoed materials available to registered media late on Sunday 12 May.

The IPCC Chair, Task Force Co-Chairs and other senior officials and authors will be available for interview following the press conference. Interview requests can be submitted here.

Besides considering the 2019 Refinement the IPCC will also transact other business, including consideration of a report from the IPCC Task Group on Gender. A full agenda of the meeting can be found here.

 

For more information contact:

IPCC Press Office, Email: ipcc-media@wmo.int , Phone in Kyoto: +81-3-5521-8247

 

Notes for Editors

About the IPCC

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is the UN body for assessing the science related to climate change. It was established by the United Nations Environment Programme (now UN Environment) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in 1988 to provide policymakers with regular scientific assessments concerning climate change, its implications and potential future risks, and to put forward adaptation and mitigation strategies. It has 195 member states.

IPCC assessments provide governments, at all levels, with scientific information that they can use to develop climate policies. IPCC assessments are a key input into the international negotiations to tackle climate change. IPCC reports are drafted and reviewed in several stages, thus guaranteeing objectivity and transparency.

The IPCC assesses the thousands of scientific papers published each year to inform policymakers about the state of knowledge on climate change. The IPCC identifies where there is agreement in the scientific community, where there are differences and where further research is needed. It does not conduct its own research.

To produce its reports, the IPCC mobilizes hundreds of scientists. These scientists and officials are drawn from diverse backgrounds. Only a dozen permanent staff work in the IPCC’s Secretariat.

The IPCC has three working groups: Working Group I (the physical science basis of climate change); Working Group II (impacts, adaptation and vulnerability); and Working Group III (mitigation of climate change). It also has a Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories that develops methodologies for estimating anthropogenic emissions and removals of greenhouse gases. All of these are supported by Technical Support Units guiding the production of IPCC assessment reports and other products.

IPCC Assessment Reports consist of contributions from each of the three working groups and a Synthesis Report. Special Reports undertake a shorter assessment of specific cross-disciplinary issues that usually span more than one working group.

IPCC Methodologies

The IPCC’s Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories (TFI) develops and refines an internationally agreed methodology and software for the calculation and reporting of national greenhouse gas emissions and removals, and encourages the use of this methodology by countries participating in the IPCC and by Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

Parties to the UNFCCC regularly report greenhouse gas emissions and removals to the UNFCCC. By communicating information on greenhouse gas emissions and actions to reduce them, this transparency and reporting system helps Parties understand ambition and progress on climate action.

 

About the Sixth Assessment Cycle

At its 41st Session in February 2015, the IPCC decided to produce a Sixth Assessment Report (AR6). At its 42nd Session in October 2015 it elected a new Bureau that would oversee the work on this report and Special Reports to be produced in the assessment cycle.

At its 43rd Session in April 2016, the IPCC accepted an invitation from the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) to provide a special report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways, and decided to produce two other Special Reports, a Methodology Report and the Sixth Assessment Report.

Global Warming of 1.5°C, An IPCC special report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways, in the context of strengthening the global response to the threat of climate change, sustainable development, and efforts to eradicate poverty was released on 8 October 2018.

Besides the methodology report 2019 Refinement, the IPCC will finalize two Special Reports in 2019:

The three working group contributions to AR6 will be released in 2021, and the AR6 Synthesis Report will be finalized in the first half of 2022.

For more information go to www.ipcc.ch

KYOTO, Japan, May 8 – The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) opened its 49th Session on Wednesday in Kyoto, Japan, where it will consider an update to the methodology used by governments to estimate their greenhouse gas emissions and removals.

The Panel will consider the methodology report 2019 Refinement to the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories during the session held on 8-12 May and hosted by the Government of Japan.

The IPCC’s Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories (TFI) develops and refines an internationally agreed methodology and software for the calculation and reporting of national greenhouse gas emissions and removals, and encourages the use of this methodology by countries participating in the IPCC and by Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

This methodology supports the transparency and reporting under UNFCCC processes, such as the Kyoto Protocol and Paris Agreement.

“The 2019 Refinement will improve this transparency and reporting process by ensuring that the methodology used to determine these inventories is based on the latest science,” said IPCC Chair Hoesung Lee.

Besides considering the 2019 Refinement the IPCC will also transact other business, including consideration of a report from the IPCC Task Group on Gender. A full agenda of the meeting can be found here.

For more information contact:
IPCC Press Office, Email: ipcc-media@wmo.int

 

Notes for Editors

About the IPCC
The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is the UN body for assessing the science related to climate change. It was established by the United Nations Environment Programme (now UN Environment) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in 1988 to provide policymakers with regular scientific assessments concerning climate change, its implications and potential future risks, and to put forward adaptation and mitigation strategies. It has 195 member states.

IPCC assessments provide governments, at all levels, with scientific information that they can use to develop climate policies. IPCC assessments are a key input into the international negotiations to tackle climate change. IPCC reports are drafted and reviewed in several stages, thus guaranteeing objectivity and transparency.

The IPCC assesses the thousands of scientific papers published each year to inform policymakers about the state of knowledge on climate change. The IPCC identifies where there is agreement in the scientific community, where there are differences and where further research is needed. It does not conduct its own research.

To produce its reports, the IPCC mobilizes hundreds of scientists. These scientists and officials are drawn from diverse backgrounds. Only a dozen permanent staff work in the IPCC’s Secretariat.

The IPCC has three working groups: Working Group I (the physical science basis of climate change); Working Group II (impacts, adaptation and vulnerability); and Working Group III (mitigation of climate change). It also has a Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories that develops methodologies for estimating anthropogenic emissions and removals of greenhouse gases. All of these are supported by Technical Support Units guiding the production of IPCC assessment reports and other products.

IPCC Assessment Reports consist of contributions from each of the three working groups and a Synthesis Report. Special Reports undertake a shorter assessment of specific cross-disciplinary issues that usually span more than one working group.

IPCC Methodologies
The IPCC’s Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories (TFI) develops and refines an internationally agreed methodology and software for the calculation and reporting of national greenhouse gas emissions and removals, and encourages the use of this methodology by countries participating in the IPCC and by Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

Parties to the UNFCCC regularly report greenhouse gas emissions and removals to the UNFCCC. By communicating information on greenhouse gas emissions and actions to reduce them, this transparency and reporting system helps Parties understand ambition and progress on climate action.

About the Sixth Assessment Cycle
At its 41st Session in February 2015, the IPCC decided to produce a Sixth Assessment Report (AR6). At its 42nd Session in October 2015 it elected a new Bureau that would oversee the work on this report and Special Reports to be produced in the assessment cycle.

At its 43rd Session in April 2016, the IPCC accepted an invitation from the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) to provide a special report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways, and decided to produce two other Special Reports, a Methodology Report and the Sixth Assessment Report.

Global Warming of 1.5°C, An IPCC special report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways, in the context of strengthening the global response to the threat of climate change, sustainable development, and efforts to eradicate poverty was released on 8 October 2018.

Besides the methodology report 2019 Refinement, the IPCC will finalize two Special Reports in 2019:

The three working group contributions to AR6 will be released in 2021, and the AR6 Synthesis Report will be finalized in the first half of 2022.

For more information go to www.ipcc.ch

 

 

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is calling for nominations of experts to take part in the Scoping Meeting of the Synthesis Report of the Sixth Assessment Report (AR6) to be held in Singapore on 21-23 October 2019.

This is the initial step in the preparation of the report that will conclude the IPCC’s Sixth Assessment cycle in 2022 in time for the Global Stocktake – a review in 2023 by governments of their goals to address climate change under the Paris Agreement.

Experts attending scoping meetings prepare a draft outline for IPCC reports. Nominations for participation are solicited from IPCC National Focal Points, observer organizations and Bureau members. Details can be found at https://apps.ipcc.ch/nominations/scoping/syr2/public/.

The Synthesis Report integrates material in the Assessment Report and Special Reports of the respective assessment. This Synthesis Report will build on and complement the three Special Reports and the three Working Group contributions prepared during the Sixth Assessment cycle.

The AR6 Synthesis Report is due to be completed in the first half of 2022 and will provide policymakers at all levels with scientific information they can use to develop sound climate policies and serve as a key input into international negotiations to tackle climate change.

A preliminary scoping meeting in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, in May 2017 developed an initial broad outline of the Synthesis Report, which was considered by the IPCC in September 2017. This preliminary outline will be further developed in Singapore by the selected experts and presented to the Panel for consideration.

 

For more information:

IPCC Press Office, Email: ipcc-media@wmo.int

Jonathan Lynn, + 41 22 730 8066, Werani Zabula, + 41 22 730 8120, Nina Peeva, + 41 22 730 8142

Follow IPCC on Facebook, Twitter , LinkedIn and Instagram

 

Notes for Editors

About the IPCC

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is the UN body for assessing the science related to climate change. It was established by the United Nations Environment Programme (now UN Environment) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in 1988 to provide policymakers with regular scientific assessments concerning climate change, its implications and potential future risks, and to put forward adaptation and mitigation strategies. It has 195 member states.

IPCC assessments provide governments, at all levels, with scientific information that they can use to develop climate policies. IPCC assessments are a key input into the international negotiations to tackle climate change. IPCC reports are drafted and reviewed in several stages, thus guaranteeing objectivity and transparency.

The IPCC assesses the thousands of scientific papers published each year to inform policymakers about the state of knowledge on climate change. The IPCC identifies where there is agreement in the scientific community, where there are differences and where further research is needed. It does not conduct its own research.

To produce its reports, the IPCC mobilizes hundreds of scientists. These scientists and officials are drawn from diverse backgrounds. Only a dozen permanent staff work in the IPCC’s Secretariat.

The IPCC has three working groups: Working Group I (the physical science basis of climate change); Working Group II (impacts, adaptation and vulnerability); and Working Group III (mitigation of climate change). It also has a Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories that develops methodologies for estimating anthropogenic emissions and removals of greenhouse gases. All of these are supported by Technical Support Units guiding the production of IPCC assessment reports and other products.

About the Sixth Assessment Cycle

At its 41st Session in February 2015, the IPCC decided to produce a Sixth Assessment Report (AR6). At its 42nd Session in October 2015 it elected a new Bureau that would oversee the work on this report and Special Reports to be produced in the assessment cycle.

At its 43rd Session in April 2016, the IPCC accepted an invitation from the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) to provide a special report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways, and decided to produce two other Special Reports, a Methodology Report and the Sixth Assessment Report (AR6).

AR6 will assess scientific findings that have been published since the IPCC’s last comprehensive report, the Fifth Assessment Report (AR5), completed in 2014. AR6 will consist of contributions from each of the three IPCC Working Groups and a Synthesis Report.

Global Warming of 1.5°C, An IPCC special report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways, in the context of strengthening the global response to the threat of climate change, sustainable development, and efforts to eradicate poverty was released on 8 October 2018.

The IPCC will finalize three reports in 2019:

The three working group contributions to AR6 will be released in 2021, and the AR6 Synthesis Report, integrating all the products in this assessment cycle, will be finalized in the first half of 2022.

For more information go to www.ipcc.ch.

GENEVA, 30 April – The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has opened the first order draft  of the Working Group I contribution to the Sixth Assessment Report (AR6) to expert review, marking an important advance in preparation of the flagship report.

The review runs from 29 April to 23 June 2019, and interested experts can register until midnight CET on 16 June 2019 at https://apps.ipcc.ch/comments/ar6wg1/fod/register.php.

IPCC reports go through repeated drafts and reviews to help ensure that the report provides a balanced and comprehensive assessment of the latest scientific findings.

The Working Group I contribution to the AR6, Climate Change 2021: The Physical Science Basis, will assess large-scale climate changes, climate processes and feedback and regional climate information.

During the review, experts may comment on the structure and comprehensiveness of the report and suggest improvements on the presentation of materials graphically or through tables. They may also propose revisions, relevant additional papers with full citation, and shorten text without losing relevant information.

IPCC reports undergo multiple stages of reviews, first by experts and then by both governments and experts.  Experts who comment on this draft will also be invited to comment on the second order draft. All expert R\reviewers will be acknowledged in the published report, due to be finalized in 2021.

More information on the role of an expert reviewer is available in Annex 1 of Appendix A to the Principles Governing IPCC Work.

Additional information explaining the Expert Review process is available here:   https://www.ipcc.ch/site/assets/uploads/2017/08/AR6_WGI_FOD_Guidance_Note.pdf

For more information:
Working Group I Technical Support Unit, tsu@ipcc-wg1.fr
IPCC Press Office, Email: ipcc-media@wmo.int
Jonathan Lynn, + 41 22 730 8066, Werani Zabula, + 41 22 730 8120

 

Notes for editors

 About the IPCC
The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is the UN body for assessing the science related to climate change. It was established by the United Nations Environment Programme (now UN Environment) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in 1988 to provide policymakers with regular scientific assessments concerning climate change, its implications and potential future risks, and to put forward adaptation and mitigation strategies. It has 195 member states.

IPCC assessments provide governments, at all levels, with scientific information that they can use to develop climate policies. IPCC assessments are a key input into the international negotiations to tackle climate change. IPCC reports are drafted and reviewed in several stages, thus guaranteeing objectivity and transparency.

The IPCC assesses the thousands of scientific papers published each year to inform policymakers about the state of knowledge on climate change. The IPCC identifies where there is agreement in the scientific community, where there are differences and where further research is needed. It does not conduct its own research.

To produce its reports, the IPCC mobilizes hundreds of scientists. These scientists and officials are drawn from diverse backgrounds. Only a dozen permanent staff work in the IPCC’s Secretariat.

The IPCC has three working groups: Working Group I (the physical science basis of climate change); Working Group II (impacts, adaptation and vulnerability); and Working Group III (mitigation of climate change). It also has a Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories that develops methodologies for estimating anthropogenic emissions and removals of greenhouse gases. All of these are supported by Technical Support Units guiding the production of IPCC assessment reports and other products.

IPCC Assessment Reports consist of contributions from each of the three working groups and a Synthesis Report. Special Reports undertake a shorter assessment of specific cross-disciplinary issues that usually span more than one working group.

About the Sixth Assessment Cycle

At its 41st Session in February 2015, the IPCC decided to produce a Sixth Assessment Report (AR6). At its 42nd Session in October 2015 it elected a new Bureau that would oversee the work on this report and Special Reports to be produced in the assessment cycle.

At its 43rd Session in April 2016, the IPCC accepted an invitation from the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) to provide a special report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways, and decided to produce two other Special Reports, a Methodology Report and the Sixth Assessment Report.

Global Warming of 1.5°C, An IPCC special report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways, in the context of strengthening the global response to the threat of climate change, sustainable development, and efforts to eradicate poverty was released on 8 October 2018.

The IPCC will finalize three reports in 2019:

The three working group contributions to AR6 will be released in 2021, and the AR6 Synthesis Report, integrating all the products in this assessment cycle, will be finalized in the first half of 2022.

For more information go to www.ipcc.ch