GENEVA, Jan 17 – The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) will consider the Working Group II contribution to the Sixth Assessment Report at a session to be held virtually from 14 to 25 February.  The Working Group II report is assessing climate change impacts, adaptation and vulnerability.

The meeting in February is both the 55th Session of the IPCC and the 12th Session of the Working Group II.

This means that the 12th Session of Working Group II will consider the Summary for Policymakers of the report for approval line-by-line. This is done by government representatives in dialogue with report authors. This session concludes with the acceptance of the underlying scientific-technical assessment. Then the 55th Session of the IPCC will accept the work of the Working Group II, thus formally accepting the entire report.

Release of the Working Group II Summary for Policymakers – Press conference

Following the closure of the 55th IPCC Session and subject to Panel’s approval of the Summary for Policymakers, the release of the Working Group II contribution to the Sixth Assessment Report entitled Climate Change 2022: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability and a virtual press conference to present the Summary for Policymakers is scheduled for:

10:00 a.m. CET (Berlin) on Monday, 28 February 2022 – 04.00 EDT (New York), 09:00 GMT (London), 12:00 EAT (Nairobi), 16:00 ICT (Bangkok)

The press conference will be streamed live and further details about scheduled speakers and how to access the live stream will be sent closer to the time. Registered media will also receive details on how to submit questions closer to the time (more details on registration in “How to register” section of this advisory.

The IPCC Chair, Working Group II Co-Chairs and report authors will be available for interviews after the press conference. Details on how media can request interviews will be sent in the coming weeks.

Opening Ceremony of the 55th IPCC Session

The 55th Session of the IPCC will open at 10:00 a.m. (CET) on Monday 14 February 2022. The opening ceremony will be streamed live. Since this is a virtual meeting, registration for the opening session is not necessary. Details of how to follow the livestream will be sent nearer the time.

The opening ceremony, running for an hour, will include addresses by the IPCC Chair, senior officials from the United Nations Environment Programme, the World Meteorological Organisation and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, and others.

The opening ceremony is open to media. Otherwise the IPCC meeting is closed to the public and media.

Embargoed materials

The Summary for Policymakers of Climate Change 2022: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability, the press release and other materials will be made available to registered media under embargo shortly after approval of the Summary for Policymakers.

The exact time when the embargoed material will be made available will depend on the duration of the plenary approving the Summary for Policymakers and acceptance of the underlying report. Registered media will receive an email alert when the embargoed materials have been posted.

Please note that registering for the press conference will not automatically provide you with access to embargoed materials. Media representatives wishing to access the embargoed materials must select the option for “embargo” in the online accreditation form, regardless of whether they are registering to attend the press conference or not. 

The embargo will run until the start of the press conference. Registering for access will require media representatives to adhere to the terms of the embargo. Failure to adhere to the conditions, e.g. publishing stories based on the embargoed materials before the start of the press conference, will result in IPCC withdrawing access to future embargoed materials and embargo arrangements.

How to register

The IPCC operates its own press accreditation system. Please check our accreditation and registration FAQs: https://apps.ipcc.ch/eventmanager/press/docs/ipcc_media_accreditation_FAQs.pdf.  

It is not necessary to register simply to follow the live stream of the press conference. Registration is only required to receive details of how to submit questions during the press conference and/or to access embargoed materials.

To register please click “Register” here and fill in the form that comes up.

Please ensure that you have scanned copies of your credentials ready when you start filling in the form, as the system will not allow you to proceed without uploading these. You can upload up to two files in JPG, PNG and PDF formats. Altogether these two files should not exceed 4MB in total.

The required credentials are:

Before filling in the form, please carefully read the guidelines below, which need to be followed by all users, including media representatives who have used the system before. 

On the IPCC media portal, follow the following steps:

The IPCC media team will review your credentials. Once you are registered to attend the press conference you will receive an email confirming your registration. If you request access to the embargoed materials, the email you receive will have credentials to use to log into the system. To access the system you will need to agree to respect the terms of the embargo.

Please note that due to the high number of requests, approval of registration might take several days. 

If you have used the system before, the email that you receive will indicate that you should use “Your global IPCC password”, which refers to your previous password. In case you have lost it, please click “Forgot password” on the IPCC media registration page.

The deadline for registration is Friday, 18 February 2022. We encourage you to register as soon as possible and not leave it to the last minute as the IPCC has limited capacity to deal with late or last-minute requests. The IPCC cannot guarantee that it will be able to review requests submitted after the deadline.

Each member of a media team should register individually using their unique email address.

Embargoed materials are primarily for the use by media covering the release of the report. Access may be extended to relevant bodies preparing communications activities and materials to coincide with the release of the report. Like media representatives, you will be required when registering and when accessing materials to agree to respect the terms of the embargo. When registering, your credentials will be an ID from your institution confirming your position, or a scanned copy of your business card and a general ID such as a passport or national identity card.

Other arrangements

The IPCC will advise nearer the time on how to request interviews with IPCC experts and scientists. Given the COVID-19 pandemic, interviews will be held remotely.  IPCC will also share details on how to access the live stream of the press conference scheduled for 28 February. Media representatives who have registered for the press conference will also receive details on to submit questions during the press conference. We will also issue a further media advisory on arrangements for broadcasters.

ENDS

For more information contact:

IPCC Press Office, Email: media@ipcc.ch 
Andrej Mahecic, + 41 22 730 8516, Werani Zabula, + 41 22 730 8120, Nina Peeva, + 41 22 730 8142 and Melissa Walsh +41 22 730 8532.

Notes for Editors

 About the IPCC

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is the UN body for assessing the science related to climate change. It was established by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in 1988 to provide political leaders with periodic scientific assessments concerning climate change, its implications and risks, as well as to put forward adaptation and mitigation strategies. In the same year the UN General Assembly endorsed the action by the WMO and UNEP in jointly establishing the IPCC. It has 195 member states.

Thousands of people from all over the world contribute to the work of the IPCC. For the assessment reports, experts volunteer their time as IPCC authors to assess the thousands of scientific papers published each year to provide a comprehensive summary of what is known about the drivers of climate change, its impacts and future risks, and how adaptation and mitigation can reduce those risks.

The IPCC has three working groups: Working Group I, dealing with the physical science basis of climate change; Working Group II, dealing with impacts, adaptation and vulnerability; and Working Group III, dealing with the mitigation of climate change. It also has a Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories that develops methodologies for measuring emissions and removals.

IPCC assessments provide governments, at all levels, with scientific information that they can use to develop climate policies. IPCC assessments are a key input into the international negotiations to tackle climate change. IPCC reports are drafted and reviewed in several stages, thus guaranteeing objectivity and transparency.

About the Sixth Assessment Cycle

Comprehensive scientific assessment reports are published every 6 to 7 years; the latest, the Fifth Assessment Report, was completed in 2014 and provided the main scientific input to the Paris Agreement. 

At its 41st Session in February 2015, the IPCC decided to produce a Sixth Assessment Report (AR6). At its 42nd Session in October 2015 it elected a new Bureau that would oversee the work on this report and Special Reports to be produced in the assessment cycle. At its 43rd Session in April 2016, it decided to produce three Special Reports, a Methodology Report and AR6. 

The Working Group I contribution to the Sixth Assessment Report Climate Change 2021: the Physical Science Basis was released on 9 August 2021.

More information about the Working Group II report, including its agreed outline, can be found here.

The Working Group III contribution is scheduled to be finalized in April 2022.

The concluding Synthesis Report is due later in 2022.

The IPCC also publishes special reports on more specific issues between assessment reports.

Global Warming of 1.5°C, an IPCC special report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways, in the context of strengthening the global response to the threat of climate change, sustainable development, and efforts to eradicate poverty was launched in October 2018.

Climate Change and Land, an IPCC special report on climate change, desertification, land degradation, sustainable land management, food security, and greenhouse gas fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems was launched in August 2019, and the Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate was released in September 2019.

In May 2019 the IPCC released the 2019 Refinement to the 2006 IPCC Guidelines on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories, an update to the methodology used by governments to estimate their greenhouse gas emissions and removals. 

For more information visit www.ipcc.ch.

The website includes outreach materials including videos about the IPCC and video recordings from outreach events conducted as webinars or live-streamed events.

Most videos published by the IPCC can be found on our YouTube and Vimeo channels.  
***

GENEVA, Jan 3 – The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has opened registration for the Government and Expert Review of the Draft of the Summary for Policymakers and longer report of the Sixth Assessment Synthesis Report.

As of today, interested experts can register for participation in the review here: https://apps.ipcc.ch/comments/ar6syr/fod/register.php. The Government and Expert Review of the Synthesis Report of the Sixth Assessment Report will take place from 10 January to 20 March 2022, 23:59 (GMT+1). 

Registration of experts closes on 13 March 2022, 23:59 (GMT+1), one week before the end of the review.

The Synthesis Report is the final product of the Sixth Assessment Report to be approved in September 2022. It synthesises and integrates  the findings of all three Working Group contributions to the Sixth Assessment Report and the special reports that have been produced in this cycle.

“The Synthesis Report will bring together all the findings and work of the IPCC during the entire Sixth Assessment Cycle. This is why the review and scrutiny by both governments and experts is such a crucial and critical part of the process. The review will further firm up policy relevance, the scientific integrity and robustness of this closing chapter of the Sixth Assessment Cycle,” said Hoesung Lee, the Chair of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

In August 2021, the IPCC released the approved Working Group I report which assessed the state of physical science, showing that climate change is widespread, rapid and intensifying. The second and third instalments from Working Group II and III are scheduled to be released at the end of February and early April respectively in 2022.

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought its challenges with the Synthesis Report Core Writing Team having to work entirely virtually to produce this draft. 

“We have a dedicated and hardworking Core Writing Team that has developed a solid and strong  Draft of the Synthesis Report that experts and governments can comment on. After the review, the Core Writing Team will continue to work hard and address the comments received, despite the challenging circumstances of the pandemic, to prepare  the  revised Draft ready for the Final Government Distribution,” said Hoesung Lee.

More than 50 scientists and experts worldwide have dedicated their time and contributed their knowledge and expertise to the  Draft of the Synthesis Report..

For experts to register for the review, a self-declaration of expertise is required. Once the registration is complete, and before accessing the draft, reviewers agree to the terms of the review, including the confidentiality of the draft and review materials, which are provided solely for the purpose of the review. The drafts may not be cited, quoted or distributed.

The government and expert review is a formal component of the Synthesis Report development process. The drafts submitted for review, the review comments, and the subsequent responses by the authors will become publicly available once the report is published. In line with IPCC practice, review comments are not anonymous.

ENDS

For more information, please contact:

IPCC Press Office, Email: ipcc-media@wmo.int
Andrej Mahecic, +41 22 730 8516, Werani Zabula, +41 22 730 8120

Notes for editors:

About the IPCC

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is the UN body for assessing the science related to climate change. It was established by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in 1988 to provide political leaders with periodic scientific assessments concerning climate change, its implications and risks, as well as to put forward adaptation and mitigation strategies. In the same year the UN General Assembly endorsed the action by the WMO and UNEP in jointly establishing the IPCC. It has 195 member states.

Thousands of people from all over the world contribute to the work of the IPCC. For the assessment reports, experts volunteer their time as IPCC authors  to assess the thousands of scientific papers published each year to provide a comprehensive summary of what is known about the drivers of climate change, its impacts and future risks, and how adaptation and mitigation can reduce those risks.

The IPCC has three working groups: Working Group I, dealing with the physical science basis of climate change; Working Group II, dealing with impacts, adaptation and vulnerability; and Working Group III, dealing with the mitigation of climate change. It also has a Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories that develops methodologies for estimating emissions and removals of greenhouse gases.

IPCC assessments provide governments, at all levels, with scientific information that they can use to develop climate policies. IPCC assessments are a key input into the international negotiations to tackle climate change. IPCC reports are drafted and reviewed in several stages, thus guaranteeing objectivity and transparency.

About the Sixth Assessment Cycle

Comprehensive scientific assessment reports are published every 6 to 7 years; the latest, the Fifth Assessment Report, was completed in 2014 and provided the main scientific input to the Paris Agreement.

At its 41st Session in February 2015, the IPCC decided to produce a Sixth Assessment Report (AR6). At its 42nd Session in October 2015 it elected a new Bureau that would oversee the work on this report and Special Reports to be produced in the assessment cycle. At its 43rd Session in April 2016, it decided to produce three Special Reports, a Methodology Report and AR6.

The Working Group I contribution to the Sixth Assessment Report Climate Change 2021: the Physical Science Basis was released on 9 August 2021.

More information about the Working Group II report, including its agreed outline, can be found here. The Working Group II contribution is scheduled for release in late February 2022.

The Working Group III contribution is expected to be finalized in early April 2022.

The concluding Synthesis Report is due in September 2022.

The IPCC has published three special reports in this assessment cycle.

Global Warming of 1.5°C, an IPCC special report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways, in the context of strengthening the global response to the threat of climate change, sustainable development, and efforts to eradicate poverty was launched in October 2018.

Climate Change and Land, an IPCC special report on climate change, desertification, land degradation, sustainable land management, food security, and greenhouse gas fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems was launched in August 2019.

The Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate was released in September 2019.

In May 2019 the IPCC released the 2019 Refinement to the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories, an update to the methodology used by governments to estimate their greenhouse gas emissions and removals.

For more information please visit www.ipcc.ch.

The website includes outreach materials including videos about the IPCC and video recordings from outreach events  conducted as webinars or live-streamed events. 

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is seeking a Website Content Manager to manage and implement publication of the report websites for the three Working Group contributions to the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report (AR6) as well as the Synthesis Report, which integrates the findings of three Working Group contributions.

The successful candidate will play a major role in communicating the findings and key concepts of the AR6 to audiences around the world through these dedicated report websites.

The Website Content Manager’s primary task will be the timely and accurate publication of the full content of the three reports being produced by IPCC Working Groups I, II, and III and the Synthesis Report. This will include converting text, tables, and figures from multiple large InDesign files into HTML with appropriate tags and styles. S/he will also contribute to the design, functionality, infrastructure, and deployment of the report websites, in collaboration with the Technical Support Units (TSUs) for the three Working Groups and the Synthesis Report TSU. Further responsibilities will include maintaining website content, troubleshooting anomalies, ensuring the content is accurate, and acting on feedback from the TSUs and IPCC Secretariat.

The Website Content Manager will be reporting to the IPCC Web Team.

Responsibilities

Website Content Management

Website Project Management

Requirements

Desirable skills

Duration
9 months (spread out depending on the time the content is ready for publication)

Location: Virtual and mainly collaborating with people in the Central European Time (CET) zone.

Proposal Submission
Please send your CV or Resume that includes links to samples of work to ipcc_it@wmo.int no later than midnight CET on 21 January 2022

GENEVA, Dec 21 – The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Scholarship Programme has awarded 33 doctoral and post-doctoral candidates from developing countries and countries with economies in transition with scholarships. These will boost the new scientific research in developing nations and will provide critical support to the early career scientists to successfully complete their respective research and their doctoral theses. The 33 applicants were selected from over 320 applications received for this Sixth Round of Awards (2021-2023).

Twenty-seven of the 33 scholarships were announced during the Prince Albert II of Monaco Foundation Awards Ceremony on 29 October 2021 in Monaco.

Funded by the Prince Albert II of Monaco Foundation and their partner:

Funded by the Cuomo Foundation:

The IPCC Scholarship Programme has continued to benefit from the generous support  of its funding partners: the Prince Albert II of Monaco Foundation (2011-date), the Cuomo Foundation (2013-date). From 2021, the Scholarship Programme received additional support from the AXA Research Fund.  

The AXA Research Fund has generously provided funding for:

The IPCC developed its scholarship programme after being jointly awarded the Nobel Peace Prize with Al Gore in 2007 for its work in building up and disseminating knowledge about climate change and laying foundations for response options. The IPCC decided to invest the Noble Prize money in post-graduate education for young scientists. Recently the IPCC has been  named the recipient of Dickinson College’s Rose-Walters Prize whose prize money will also be put towards the scholarship programme.

-ENDS-

For more information, please contact:
IPCC Press Office, Email: ipcc-media@wmo.int
IPCC scholarship programme, Email: ipcc-sp@wmo.int

Notes for editors

About the IPCC

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is the UN body for assessing the science related to climate change. It was established by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in 1988 to provide political leaders with periodic scientific assessments concerning climate change, its implications and risks, as well as to put forward adaptation and mitigation strategies. In the same year the UN General Assembly endorsed the action by the WMO and UNEP in jointly establishing the IPCC. It has 195 member states.

Thousands of people from all over the world contribute to the work of the IPCC. For the assessment reports, experts volunteer their time as IPCC authors to assess the thousands of scientific papers published each year to provide a comprehensive summary of what is known about the drivers of climate change, its impacts and future risks, and how adaptation and mitigation can reduce those risks.

The IPCC has three working groups: Working Group I, dealing with the physical science basis of climate change; Working Group II, dealing with impacts, adaptation and vulnerability; and Working Group III, dealing with the mitigation of climate change. It also has a Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories that develops methodologies for estimating emissions and removals of greenhouse gases.

IPCC assessments provide governments, at all levels, with scientific information that they can use to develop climate policies. IPCC assessments are a key input into the international negotiations to tackle climate change. IPCC reports are drafted and reviewed in several stages, thus guaranteeing objectivity and transparency.

***

CHECK AGAINST DELIVERY

Remarks by IPCC Chair Hoesung Lee during the opening of ICOMOS / IPCC / UNESCO Co-Sponsored meeting
6 December 2021

Your Excellencies, distinguished friends and colleagues, 

We are very happy to be working together on this with UNESCO and ICOMOS.

As Chair of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change – IPCC – I’m honoured and pleased to welcome you to this unique gathering. For the first time in IPCC’s history, we are bringing together, in one forum, the scientists and experts from the culture and heritage community and those working on climate change science. 

Not only is this a historical meeting but it is a historical opportunity to explore and deepen our collective knowledge and understanding of how climate change impacts culture and heritage, and how these can enlighten our pathways to possible solutions in tackling climate change.

Our culture and heritage are windows into millennia of human experience from which we can draw and use them to shape our strategies to adapt and to make our communities more resilient to climate change risks and challenges. Are we capable of projecting from our collective past into our shared future? I believe yes, we are. I believe this is not only possible, but it is imperative that we do so. 

For decades now, we have known that the world is warming. Our most recent report is the contribution of the Working Group I to the Sixth Assessment Report, published this summer. It laid out the most up-to-date physical science knowledge about climate change. The report clearly shows that recent changes in the climate are widespread, rapid, and intensifying, affecting every part of the world. Some of these changes are unprecedented in thousands of years.

It is indisputable that human activities are causing climate change. There are indelible human fingerprints on the changes to our climate. Compared to the pre-industrial era, our planet is already 1.1°C warmer. Human influence is making extreme climate events, including heatwaves, heavy rainfall, and droughts, more frequent and severe.

Climate change is already affecting every region on Earth, in multiple ways. The changes we’re experiencing today will increase with further warming.

It is critical to recognise that there is no going back from some changes in the climate system. However, some of these changes could be slowed and others could be stopped by limiting warming.

And the science is very clear on that. Unless there are immediate, rapid, and large-scale reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, limiting warming to 1.5°C or even 2°C will be pushed beyond our reach. 

But it is not just about temperature. Climate change is bringing multiple different changes in different regions, such as more intense rainfall and associated flooding, as well as more intense drought in many regions.

Some of these changes in our climate system are particularly relevant to the theme of this gathering and they present a clear and imminent threat to our culture and heritage.

For example, the continued sea-level rise will have irreversible and dire impacts on people living in the small Island States, such as Kiribati and Tuvalu or in the Arctic. This means loss of human habitat, loss of territory and livelihoods, posing complex and difficult existential questions not only for these societies but equally so for the entire international community.

Consequently, this also means the loss of cultural identity, material and non-material traditions and the sense of belonging for these communities. Beyond these themes, there are additional layers of interlinked and complex social, economic, legal, human mobility and other questions that warrant the full and undivided attention of policymakers.

We also must recognize the threats posed by storm-driven coastal erosion, temperature changes, rising sea levels and floods to the world’s cultural heritage sites. Most of these sites are bedrocks and sources of vitally important indigenous knowledge. Their physical loss is not only an irreparable loss to our collective history and our science. As these heritage sites perish, they can leave an unbridgeable chasm in our ability to pass on indigenous and local knowledge from one generation to the next one.

One should not forget the intangible, yet so profoundly valued experiences of our cultural and natural heritage – the aesthetic and spiritual enrichment they offer to us, the role they play in societies and cultural identities, in our recreation and knowledge, and how these subtle memories and experiences shape our physical and mental health.

Distinguished friends and colleagues,

I would like to stress here that IPCC assessment reports increasingly acknowledge the need for climate science to explore and tap into all areas and forms of knowledge. This is a critical component if we as IPCC are to present comprehensive and balanced assessments of the causes, impacts and responses to climate change. 

I urge you to approach this gathering with ambition and vision. This co-sponsored meeting will allow us to explore the importance of cultural knowledge and heritage in understanding and responding to the climate change challenge. And we are only at the start. I hope this meeting will help generate more research across diverse disciplines and raise awareness among policymakers about cultural and natural heritage and climate change and possible models of adaptation and mitigation. 

Culture and heritage are vitally important aspects of our lives and resources influencing how our communities and societies adapt to climate change. This meeting is convened just before the approval session of the IPCC’s Working Group II contribution to the Sixth Assessment Report. This report will provide important information that will help inform the growing global debate on impacts and adaptation to climate change – especially given the strong focus on this issue that emerged at the COP26 in Glasgow.

I wish you a successful and productive meeting.

Thank you for your attention.

ENDS

GENEVA, Dec 1 – Bloomberg Businessweek named today Hoesung Lee, the Chair of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change to the 2021 Bloomberg 50, its annual list of innovators, entrepreneurs, and leaders who have changed the global business landscape over the past year. The list will be published in the December 6 issue of Bloomberg Businessweek.

An unranked list, the Bloomberg 50 represents the most influential thought leaders in business, finance, politics, entertainment, science and technology whose 2021 accomplishments were particularly noteworthy.

ENDS

Notes for Editors

About the IPCC

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is the UN body for assessing the science related to climate change. It was established by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in 1988 to provide political leaders with periodic scientific assessments concerning climate change, its implications and risks, as well as to put forward adaptation and mitigation strategies. In the same year the UN General Assembly endorsed the action by the WMO and UNEP in jointly establishing the IPCC. It has 195 member states.

Thousands of people from all over the world contribute to the work of the IPCC. For the assessment reports, experts  volunteer their time as IPCC authors to assess the thousands of scientific papers published each year to provide a comprehensive summary of what is known about the drivers of climate change, its impacts and future risks, and how adaptation and mitigation can reduce those risks.

The IPCC has three working groups: Working Group I, dealing with the physical science basis of climate change; Working Group II, dealing with impacts, adaptation and vulnerability; and Working Group III, dealing with the mitigation of climate change. It also has a Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories that develops methodologies for estimating emissions and removals of greenhouse gases.

IPCC assessments provide governments, at all levels, with scientific information that they can use to develop climate policies. IPCC assessments are a key input into the international negotiations to tackle climate change. IPCC reports are drafted and reviewed in several stages, thus guaranteeing objectivity and transparency.

GENEVA, Nov 29 – The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has distributed the Final Draft of the Working Group III contribution to the Sixth Assessment Report (AR6) to governments. The final draft of the Summary for Policymakers has also been distributed for further review by governments. This is one of the final stages of preparations before IPCC member countries will consider this report in a plenary next year.

“Our scientists have worked tirelessly to deliver this report thorough a robust assessment of scientific evidence. The report will inform policymakers world-wide about pathways to solutions and opportunities available to us to tackle climate change,” said Jim Skea, Co-Chair of Working Group III.

The review of the Summary for Policymakers, running to 30 January 2022, provides governments with the opportunity to check whether the draft Summary for Policymakers reflects the underlying evidence laid out in the Working Group III report. Working Group III is responsible for assessing the mitigation of climate change – responses and solutions to the threat of dangerous climate change by reducing emissions and enhancing sinks of the greenhouse gases that are responsible for global warming.

During the government review of the Summary for Policymakers, Working Group III is planning a series of webinars on different aspects of the report with government representatives to inform them as they prepare their written comments.  This will also help authors identify issues and receive informal feedback from governments. Authors will present key concepts of the report and how they are treated in the Summary for Policymakers, including in figures, and how the summarised elements are grounded in the detailed underlying assessment.

The Working Group III report is the third instalment of the IPCC’s Sixth Assessment Report, which will be completed in 2022. In August, the IPCC released the approved Working Group I report which assessed the physical science, showing that climate change is widespread, rapid and intensifying. The Working Group II report, which looks at climate impacts and adaptation, will be considered at an approval session in early 2022, prior to the consideration of the Working Group III report.

“These interactive webinars will be a critical support activity during the Summary for Policymakers review process, allowing an informal exchange between governments and our authors. This will ensure clarity and will strengthen the text prior to the approval session” said Priyadarshi Shukla, Co-Chair of Working Group III.

The authors of the Working Group III report have already addressed more than 16,000 comments provided by expert reviewers of the report’s First-Order Draft. In the subsequent Second-Order Draft stage they went through over 51,000 additional comments from expert reviewers and 41 governments.

The government approval session for the Working Group III report is scheduled for the end of the first quarter of 2022.

ENDS

For more information, please contact:

IPCC Working Group III Technical Support Unit
Sigourney Luz (Communications Manager), e-mail: s.luz@ipcc-wg3.ac.uk

IPCC Press Office, Email: ipcc-media@wmo.int
Andrej Mahecic, +41 22 730 8516, Werani Zabula, +41 22 730 8120

Notes for Editors

About the IPCC
The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is the UN body for assessing the science related to climate change. It was established by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in 1988 to provide political leaders with periodic scientific assessments concerning climate change, its implications and risks, as well as to put forward adaptation and mitigation strategies. In the same year the UN General Assembly endorsed the action by the WMO and UNEP in jointly establishing the IPCC. It has 195 member states.

Thousands of people from all over the world contribute to the work of the IPCC. For the assessment reports, experts  volunteer their time as IPCC authors to assess the thousands of scientific papers published each year to provide a comprehensive summary of what is known about the drivers of climate change, its impacts and future risks, and how adaptation and mitigation can reduce those risks.

The IPCC has three working groups: Working Group I, dealing with the physical science basis of climate change; Working Group II, dealing with impacts, adaptation and vulnerability; and Working Group III, dealing with the mitigation of climate change. It also has a Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories that develops methodologies for estimating emissions and removals of greenhouse gases.

IPCC assessments provide governments, at all levels, with scientific information that they can use to develop climate policies. IPCC assessments are a key input into the international negotiations to tackle climate change. IPCC reports are drafted and reviewed in several stages, thus guaranteeing objectivity and transparency.

About the Sixth Assessment Cycle
Comprehensive scientific assessment reports are published every 6 to 7 years; the most recent, the Fifth Assessment Report, was completed in 2014 and provided the main scientific input to the Paris Agreement.

The IPCC also publishes special reports on more specific issues between assessment reports.

At its 41st Session in February 2015, the IPCC decided to produce a Sixth Assessment Report (AR6). At its 42nd Session in October 2015 it elected a new Bureau that would oversee the work on this report and Special Reports to be produced in the assessment cycle. At its 43rd Session in April 2016, it decided to produce three Special Reports, a Methodology Report and AR6.

The Working Group I contribution to the Sixth Assessment Report Climate Change 2021: the Physical Science Basis was released on 9 August 2021.

More information about the Working Group III report, including its agreed outline, can be found here.

The Working Group II contribution is scheduled to be finalized in the first quarter of 2022. The concluding Synthesis Report is due later in 2022.

The IPCC has published three special reports in this assessment cycle.

Global Warming of 1.5°C, an IPCC special report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways, in the context of strengthening the global response to the threat of climate change, sustainable development, and efforts to eradicate poverty was launched in October 2018.

Climate Change and Land, an IPCC special report on climate change, desertification, land degradation, sustainable land management, food security, and greenhouse gas fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems was launched in August 2019.

TheSpecial Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate was released in September 2019.

In May 2019 the IPCC released the2019 Refinement to the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories, an update to the methodology used by governments to estimate their greenhouse gas emissions and removals.

For more information please visit http://www.ipcc.ch

The website includes outreach materials including videos about the IPCC and video recordings from outreach events  conducted as webinars or live-streamed events. 

Most videos published by the IPCC can be found on the IPCC YouTube channel.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has been named the recipient of Dickinson College’s Rose-Walters Prize. Welcoming the announcement at United Nations Climate Conference in Glasgow, the IPCC Chair Hoesung Lee said: 

“As the Chair of the IPCC, I’m very proud and happy to announce to you and our dear audience – both in this Science Pavilion and online – that the IPCC is the recipient of The Sam Rose ’58 and Julie Walters Prize at Dickinson College.

The Rose-Walters Prize honours the IPCC’s work of producing and communicating scientific knowledge that is the foundation of informed and effective action on climate change.

I’m particularly happy to be able to make this announcement on behalf of the IPCC during the COP26 in Glasgow.

The Rose-Walters Prize, which comes with the US$100,000 purse, is given annually to an individual or organization that makes a defining difference to advance responsible action on behalf of the planet, its resources and people.

The IPCC plans to use the prize money to further fund the IPCC Scholarship Programme, which provides scholarships for Ph.D. students from developing countries. This will allow them to conduct research that advances understanding of climate change risks and response strategies.”

A delegation from the IPCC will accept the award at Dickinson college in May 2022.

-ENDS-

For more information:

IPCC Press Office, Email: ipcc-media@wmo.int
Andrej Mahecic, +41 22 730 8516, Werani Zabula, +41 22 730 8120

Notes for editors

About the IPCC

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is the UN body for assessing the science related to climate change. It was established by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in 1988 to provide political leaders with periodic scientific assessments concerning climate change, its implications and risks, as well as to put forward adaptation and mitigation strategies. In the same year the UN General Assembly endorsed the action by the WMO and UNEP in jointly establishing the IPCC. It has 195 member states.

Thousands of people from all over the world contribute to the work of the IPCC. For the assessment reports, experts volunteer their time as IPCC authors to assess the thousands of scientific papers published each year to provide a comprehensive summary of what is known about the drivers of climate change, its impacts and future risks, and how adaptation and mitigation can reduce those risks.

The IPCC has three working groups: Working Group I, dealing with the physical science basis of climate change; Working Group II, dealing with impacts, adaptation and vulnerability; and Working Group III, dealing with the mitigation of climate change. It also has a Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories that develops methodologies for estimating emissions and removals of greenhouse gases.

IPCC assessments provide governments, at all levels, with scientific information that they can use to develop climate policies. IPCC assessments are a key input into the international negotiations to tackle climate change. IPCC reports are drafted and reviewed in several stages, thus guaranteeing objectivity and transparency.

***

It is with great sadness that the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) learnt of the death of former IPCC author Dr Geert Jan van Oldenborgh. Geert Jan passed away on 12 October 2021 after an 8-year battle with multiple myeloma, an incurable form of cancer.

He was a Lead Author on chapter 11 of IPCC’s Working Group I contribution to the Fifth Assessment Report. Chapter 11 is on Near-Term Climate Change Projections and Predictability.

Geert Jan was known as one of the founders of a relatively new field of climate science called climate attribution. Climate attribution is the relationship between extreme weather and climate change. He was a co-founder and co-leader of the World Weather Attribution, an initiative that conducts real-time attribution analysis of extreme weather events around the world.  All this work is a key contribution to the Sixth Assessment Report.

He was a world renown scientist with various awards to his name. TIME magazine named him as one if its 100 most influential people for 2021, together with another IPCC author Friederike Otto. In September the European Meteorological Society presented him with their Technological Achievement Award. In April 2021 he was awarded the Knight of the Order of the Netherlands Lion in recognition of his contribution to climate science. He was a visiting professor at the University of Oxford.

Geert Jan studied theoretical physics in Leiden and in the late 1980s got his doctorate in particle physics from the Dutch National Institute for Subatomic Physics. He worked for the Dutch national weather service since 1996 when he joined as a post-doc. His initial work was centred around the dynamics and predictability of El Niño and the warming of the sea water in the Eastern Pacific.

He was 59 years old. He is survived by his wife Mandy and 3 sons.

Picture courtesy of KNMI

CHECK AGAINST DELIVERY

IPCC/SBSTA special event on the Working Group I contribution to the Sixth Assessment Report at COP26.
Glasgow, 04 November 2021

Thank you Mister Chair,

Your Excellencies, Distinguished Delegates,

I’m very pleased to address you this morning as Chair of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change – IPCC.

The talks at this landmark conference in Glasgow are now underway. These talks are informed by science and findings of IPCC reports.

Over the past several years, IPCC has delivered several critically important contributions: Global Warming of 1.5C, Climate Change and Land, Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate, to mention a few.

Most recent is the contribution of the Working Group I to the Sixth Assessment Report, published this summer.

Here, I would like to recognize that this document – which clearly laid out for the policymakers worldwide the most up-to-date physical science basis for the understanding of the climate system and climate change – is dedicated to our late friend and colleague Sir John Houghton.

From 1988 to 2002 John was the chair and co-chair of the IPCC Working Group I, during the first three assessment reports. In recognition of these and other reports, in 2007, IPCC shared the Nobel Peace Prize with Al Gore. 

This brings me to this year’s Nobel Prize in Physics. Over 30 years later, modelling the Earth’s climate and the work of scientists who have contributed so much to our understanding of climate change have been recognized. Two of the three this year’s laurates –  Syukuro Manabe and Klaus Hasselmann – are IPCC authors. We congratulate Syukuro and Klaus for their great achievement!

The report we released in August is the first part of the Sixth Assessment Report. The second and third instalments are scheduled for release in February and March next year. Respectively, these contributions will provide us with the latest scientific knowledge about the impacts of climate change, adaptation, and mitigation. By September 2022 we will also bring together all these lines of research and evidence in the Synthesis Report, integrating our understanding of climate change and policy response.

The Working Group I contribution has been a significant achievement produced under very challenging circumstances of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Based on the research of thousands of scientists worldwide and more than 14,000 scientific studies, a team of over 230 authors from 65 countries have worked together for over three years to deliver this report.

As with every IPCC report, the latest contribution underwent expert and government review, which is critical to deliver a robust, rigorous, exhaustive and objective assessment. We thank the experts and governments for their comments throughout this process. In total, the authors responded to more than 78,000 comments.

The report provides a reality check, grounded in new findings on the physical state of climate change. It reflects the magnitude of the collective challenge for all nations on this planet.

Allow me to stress the key findings:

For decades, we have known that the world is warming. Recent changes in the climate are widespread, rapid, and intensifying, sparing no part of the world. They are unprecedented in thousands of years.

It is indisputable that human activities are causing climate change. Human influence is making extreme climate events, including heatwaves, heavy rainfall, and droughts, more frequent and severe.

Climate change is already affecting every region on Earth, in multiple ways. The changes we experience will increase with further warming.

There is no going back from some changes in the climate system. However, some of these changes could be slowed and others could be stopped by limiting warming.

Unless there are immediate, rapid, and large-scale reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, limiting warming to 1.5°C and even 2°C will be pushed beyond our reach.

To limit global warming, strong, rapid, and sustained reductions in CO2, methane, and other greenhouse gases are necessary. This would not only reduce the consequences of climate change but also improve air quality.

Ladies and Gentlemen, Distinguished Delegates,

Since our previous Assessment Report in 2013, there have been major advances in science globally. They range from observations, understanding of processes in the climate system, global and regional modelling to insights into our past and future climates. This science, our knowledge of current trends and our understanding of future changes are also part of solutions. It is critical they are considered in adaptation strategies and adaptation funding, and mitigation measures.

Today, we have a much more precise and clearer picture of how the climate system works. It is essential that this knowledge is embraced as integral to the ongoing talks about our future actions as we collectively prepare for more frequent, more intense, new types of extremes and climate conditions.

I wish you a successful conference.

Thank you for your attention.

ENDS

04 November 2021