The Data Distribution Centre (DDC) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate change (IPCC) is marking 25 years of support to IPCC assessments. Stretching back to the Second Assessment Report, the DDC has diligently curated, archived and disseminated data underpinning IPCC activities, acting as a long-term reference for IPCC member states. Collecting and analysing data is a fundamental building block of any scientific research and as such it is a critical component of IPCC reports which inform policy decisions at all levels. 

The DDC was established during the 13th Session of the IPCC (IPCC-13) to provide climate, socio-economic and environmental data from the past, and scenarios for the future. IPCC-13, which took place in the Maldives in 1997, determined that the DDC would be hosted by Germany and the United Kingdom. Since then, the DDC has been supporting IPCC authors and member states with quality assured, citable IPCC-relevant climate data for its assessment reports.

“The DDC plays a critical role in the IPCC ecosystem,  ensuring that relevant data is curated and available so the next generation of scientists can build on previous assessments,” said David Huard one of the Co-Chairs of the IPCC Task Group on Data Support for Climate Change Assessment (TG-Data). TG-Data oversees the work of the DDC.

The Sixth Assessment cycle (AR6) marked a major change for the DDC. Spain joined the DDC and led the development and maintenance of the Interactive Atlas, an online resource displaying key maps and results from Working Group I report. The DDC also became involved in the curation and archiving of data underlying figures and tables published in AR6. Together with the Working Group Technical Support Units and TG-Data, the DDC proposed guidelines to make IPCC data findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable. Significant efforts were devoted in AR6 to adhere to these guidelines, and enhance the transparency of the AR6 by ensuring the traceability of key statements, figures and tables, and credit all contributors.

“DDC members lend their expertise to the entire climate science community, not only to the IPCC, contributing to data and metadata standards that make international scientific collaboration possible,” added Sebastián Vicuña the other Co-Chair of TG-Data.

Currently, the DDC is jointly managed by four partners, the Deutsches Klimarechenzentrum in Germany, the Centre for International Earth Science Information Network in the USA, the Spanish Research Council and UK based MetadataWorks. Together with its collaborators, the DDC is pursuing the archival of AR6 data for future generations and preparing for the next assessment cycle and the new challenges it will bring.

27 September 2022

CHECK AGAINST DELIVERY

Distinguished Delegates, ladies and gentlemen, dear colleagues,

Welcome to the 57th Session of the IPCC!

I am delighted to greet you all, here in Geneva, at our first in-person gathering since the Panel’s 52nd session in Paris in February 2020.

On behalf of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, I wish a warm welcome to government delegations, representatives of observer organisations, IPCC authors and Bureau members.

We are also thrilled to welcome today’s addresses of our distinguished colleagues and friends – Secretary-General of the World Meteorological Organisation Petteri Taalas, Executive Director of the United Nations Environment Programme Inger Andersen, the Deputy  Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, Ovais Sarmad and the Head of the International Affairs Division the Swiss Federal Office for the Environment,  Ambassador Franz Yaver Perrez.

As the Chair of the IPCC, I also wish to express our special gratitude to the government of the Swiss Confederation and the Canton of Geneva for their generous hospitality and kind support in facilitating this business session.

Over the past two and a half years of the COVID-19 pandemic, we’ve made every effort to ensure IPCC’s business continuity. I would like to remind you that we held six electronic and written sessions in total, including incredibly complex and demanding approval sessions of assessment reports from all three Working Groups. I thank you all for your constructive and positive work throughout this difficult and challenging period.

These IPCC assessments clearly state that human-induced climate change is widespread, rapid, and intensifying. It is a threat to our well-being and all other species. It is a threat to the health of our entire planet. Any further delay in concerted global action will miss a rapidly closing window to secure a liveable future.

Allow me to remind you that prior to these three reports, the IPCC also produced three special reports and one methodology report during this cycle. I am proud that the Sixth Assessment cycle has been the busiest period in the IPCC’s history. Despite the pandemic, this was possible thanks to the dedication and commitment of the IPCC authors. We thank you for your trust in the IPCC.

The Synthesis Report will be presented to you early next year for approval and acceptance. This will be the concluding chapter of the cycle, bringing together the evidence and the data from the three Working Groups’ contributions and the three special reports.

Looking at the Sixth Assessment Cycle so far, we can collectively acknowledge IPCC’s impact and achievements. Our Special Reports and Working Group reports released during this cycle made a direct and invaluable contribution to boosting global climate awareness and climate action. They provided critical inputs for annual COP gatherings and focused global ambition on limiting the warming to 1.5 degrees. They also contributed to Climate-Land Dialogue and Ocean-Climate Dialogue. The Synthesis Report of the Sixth Assessment Report will directly feed into the Global Stocktake taking place next year.

As we adapt to the new normalcy, I should add here that all virtual sessions were superbly organised and supported by the IPCC Secretariat led by Abdalah Mokssit. Thank you, IPCC Secretariat. Thanks to your organisation, coordination, and collaboration, I am confident that our in-person session this week will run smoothly and seamlessly.

I would also like to acknowledge the outstanding efforts of the Working Group Bureaus, their Co-Chairs and authors and Technical Support Units to deliver the Sixth Assessment Report during the pandemic.

Throughout the Sixth Assessment Cycle, IPCC’s reports have informed the world about how we can enhance adaptation to and mitigation of climate change. I hope that our member governments, now equipped with this knowledge IPCC accepted and approved its summary, will enhance collective climate action and lessen the threat to the health and wellbeing of our planet and all its species. There is no time to lose. Future policymakers will only have fewer options.

The sheer magnitude and complexity of climate change dwarf anything else we face. But by raising our ambitions and taking decisive climate action for the benefit of our planet, we may find ourselves better at finding solutions to other global issues, such as food and energy crises and threats to the world’s peace and security. Our failure to act now will only multiply our challenges in the future.

I hope that this 57th session of IPCC will be another opportunity to reaffirm our resolve for a better climate and a better world.

Returning to in-person meetings may be harder than expected after such a long pause. We all may need to brush up on our live interactions and I look forward to our collective engagement over the coming days.

As the Chair of the IPCC, I thank everyone for upholding a respectful, collegial and collaborative spirit throughout this session. I wish you a positive, constructive and fruitful deliberations.

I now declare the 57th session of the IPCC open.

Thank you.

GENEVA, Sept 9 – The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has rescheduled the approval session for the Synthesis Report (SYR), which will integrate the findings of the Working Groups and Special Reports released in this assessment cycle, to be held in person from 13 to 17 March 2023, hosted by Switzerland. Following the Panel’s approval, the report’s public release is scheduled for 20 March 2023.

The Panel also rescheduled the review of the Final Government Distribution to take place from 21 November to 15 January 2023 after extensive consultations with the SYR section facilitators, the SYR Scientific Steering Committee, and the IPCC Bureau.

The Synthesis Report follows the release of three major IPCC reports over the past 12 months – the three Working Group contributions to the Sixth Assessment Report – despite the challenges to the work programme posed by the Covid-19 pandemic.

The Synthesis Report of the Sixth Assessment Report will integrate the findings of the three Working Group contributions and the three Special Reports released in 2018 and 2019. It will provide policymakers with a high-level, up-to-date understanding of climate change, its impacts and future risks, and options for addressing it.

For more information contact:

IPCC Press Office, Email: ipcc-media@wmo.int

Andrej Mahecic, +41 22 730 8516 or Werani Zabula, +41 22 730 8120

Notes for Editors

About the IPCC

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is the UN body for assessing the science related to climate change. It was established by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in 1988 to provide political leaders with periodic scientific assessments concerning climate change, its implications and risks, as well as to put forward adaptation and mitigation strategies. In the same year the UN General Assembly endorsed the action by the WMO and UNEP in jointly establishing the IPCC. It has 195 member states.

Thousands of people from all over the world contribute to the work of the IPCC. For the assessment reports, experts volunteer their time as IPCC authors to assess the thousands of scientific papers published each year to provide a comprehensive summary of what is known about the drivers of climate change, its impacts and future risks, and how adaptation and mitigation can reduce those risks.

The IPCC has three working groups: Working Group I, dealing with the physical science basis of climate change; Working Group II, dealing with impacts, adaptation and vulnerability; and Working Group III, dealing with the mitigation of climate change. It also has a Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories that develops methodologies for measuring emissions and removals.

IPCC assessments provide governments, at all levels, with scientific information that they can use to develop climate policies. IPCC assessments are a key input into the international negotiations to tackle climate change. IPCC reports are drafted and reviewed in several stages, thus guaranteeing objectivity and transparency.

About the Sixth Assessment Cycle

Comprehensive scientific assessment reports are published every 6 to 7 years; the latest, the Fifth Assessment Report, was completed in 2014 and provided the main scientific input to the Paris Agreement. 

At its 41st Session in February 2015, the IPCC decided to produce a Sixth Assessment Report (AR6). At its 42nd Session in October 2015 it elected a new Bureau that would oversee the work on this report and Special Reports to be produced in the assessment cycle. At its 43rd Session in April 2016, it decided to produce three Special Reports, a Methodology Report and AR6. 

The Working Group I contribution to the Sixth Assessment Report Climate Change 2021: the Physical Science Basis was released on 9 August 2021. The Working Group II contribution, Climate Change 2022: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability, was released on 28 February 2022. The Working Group III contribution, Climate Change 2022: Mitigation of Climate Change, was released on 4 April 2022.

The IPCC is currently working on the final installment of the Sixth Assessment Report, the Synthesis Report, which will integrate the findings of the three Working Group assessments as well as the three Special Reports released in 2018 and 2019.

Global Warming of 1.5°C, an IPCC special report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways, in the context of strengthening the global response to the threat of climate change, sustainable development, and efforts to eradicate poverty was launched in October 2018.

Climate Change and Land, an IPCC special report on climate change, desertification, land degradation, sustainable land management, food security, and greenhouse gas fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems was launched in August 2019, and the Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate was released in September 2019.

In May 2019 the IPCC released the 2019 Refinement to the 2006 IPCC Guidelines on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories, an update to the methodology used by governments to estimate their greenhouse gas emissions and removals. 

For more information visit www.ipcc.ch.

The website includes outreach materials including videos about the IPCC and video recordings from outreach events conducted as webinars or live-streamed events.

Most videos published by the IPCC can be found on our YouTube channel.  

9 June 2022
Bonn, Germany

Colleagues, Delegates,

I’m honoured to provide this keynote address at the opening ceremony of the first Technical Dialogue.

In the past 10 months the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has released a trilogy of reports providing policymakers with the most up-to-date science on climate change.  These three reports are a dire warning about the consequences of inaction. Climate change is a grave and mounting threat to our wellbeing and a healthy planet.

We are now busy working to finalise the Synthesis Report with which we will complete the Sixth Assessment Report.

The climate science is clear; our Physical Science Basis report concludes that:

Our report on Impact, Adaptation and Vulnerability shows that these levels of warming are a threat to human wellbeing and the health of the planet and that the next few years offer a rapidly closing window to realize a sustainable, livable future for all.

As the mitigation to climate change report concluded, we are not on track to limit warming to 1.5°C. Average annual GHG emissions during the last two decades were the highest in human history.

Yes, colleagues, we are at crossroads. Our actions today will shape how people adapt and nature responds to increasing climate risks.

The IPCC reports throughout this entire cycle focus on solutions.

In concluding, I wish to remind you, that the next few years will be critical, but there are ways to improve our chances of success. International cooperation is key to achieving ambitious climate goals.

I invite you to reflect on the knowledge we have developed so far which today is stronger than ever to build the decisions to address the climate challenge.

Thank you.

Wednesday 8 June 2022
Bonn, Germany

Check against delivery

Thank you, Tosi/Chair,

Welcome to this special event to present the IPCC Working Group III report, following our special event on the Working Group II report on Monday and yesterday’s first part of the Structured Expert Dialogue.

We again very much look forward to this opportunity for a direct exchange with you on our findings.

Today’s meeting responds to the Glasgow COP invitation to the IPCC to present its forthcoming reports. It will be followed by the second structured expert dialogue session this afternoon looking at this report.

The Working Group III report provides an updated global assessment of climate change mitigation progress and pledges and examines the sources of global emissions, assessing the impact of national climate pledges in relation to the long-term climate goals.

Among the innovations in this report, which builds on the 2014 Fifth Assessment and the special reports prepared earlier in the Sixth Assessment cycle, are a new chapter on the social aspects of mitigation exploring the “demand side” – what drives consumption and greenhouse gas emissions, and serving as a complement to the traditional sectoral chapters on what produces emissions.

This report also includes a cross-sector chapter on mitigation options cutting across sectors including carbon dioxide removal techniques, and a new chapter on innovation, technology development and transfer.

The Working Group III report, finalized only two months ago, assesses progress made in limiting global emissions as well as available options across sectors and systems for reducing and stopping the global warming

The IPCC WGI  report on Physical Science Basis launched in August last year and presented to you on Glasgow in November last year showed that human activities have warmed the planet at a rate not seen in at least the past 2000 years and  we are on course to reaching global warming of 1.5 degrees Celsius within the next two decades.

As we heard on Monday in the Working Group II report, these levels of warming are posing a grave and mounting threat to the wellbeing of billions of people and the health of life on the planet and that the next few years offer a rapidly closing window to realize a sustainable, livable future for all.  

Our event will follow the structure of the Summary for Policymakers, looking at recent developments and current trends; system transformations to limit global warming; linkages between mitigation, adaptation and sustainable development; and strengthening the response to climate change.

You will shortly hear the detail from IPCC Co-chairs and authors who prepared the report. But let me summarize the key findings:

We are at a crossroads. The decisions we make now can ensure a liveable future. We have the tools and know-how required to limit warming.

But we have experienced the highest decadal increase in greenhouse gas emissions in human history and we are not on track to limit warming to 1.5ºC.

There is increasing evidence of climate action and there are options available in all sectors that can at least halve emissions by 2030.

The next few years will be critical. But there are ways to improve our chances of success.

However, unless there are immediate and deep greenhouse gas emission reductions across all sectors and regions, 1.5ºC is beyond reach.

Looking beyond technology, the report shows that financial flows are three to six times lower than levels needed by 2030 to limit warming to below 2ºC. However, there is sufficient global capital and liquidity to close investment gaps.

Without ambitious climate action, sustainable development cannot be achieved. Before we invite Jim Skea and Priyadarshi Shukla, Co-Chairs of Working Group III to begin the presentation, we will watch a video dedicated to the report. I look forward to our discussion.

Monday, 6 June 2022
Bonn, Germany

Thank you, Tosi/Chair,

Let me also welcome you all to this special event to present the IPCC Working Group II report, the first of several activities involving the IPCC at these Subsidiary Bodies meetings.

We very much look forward to this opportunity for a direct exchange with you on our findings.

Today’s meeting responds to the Glasgow COP invitation to the IPCC to present its forthcoming reports. It follows the special event at COP26 in Glasgow last November to present the Working Group I report and will be followed by a special event on Wednesday on the Working Group III report.

With that, we will complete the presentation of the three IPCC working groups’ contributions to the Sixth Assessment Report.

Furthermore, we will be working with you here in Bonn over the next ten days  to  unpack  the findings of our reports and to place them in the context of the global stocktake, global goal on adaptation, as well on identifying research gaps for future scientific work and assessments.

Meanwhile, the IPCC is busy completing the Synthesis Report, integrating all the knowledge produced in this assessment cycle.

The Working Group II report, finalized a little over three months ago, examines how the continuing climate change identified in the Working Group I report last August is impacting people, wildlife and farming.

It examines future impacts and risks at different levels of warming and considers the options and limits for humankind and nature to adjust to the changes to our climate system underway or in the pipeline, strengthening society and nature’s resilience to climate change.

Among the innovations in this report, which builds on the Fifth Assessment Report in 2014 and the special reports prepared earlier in this cycle, there are sections on climate change impacts, risks and options to act for cities and settlements by the sea, tropical forests, mountains, biodiversity hotspots, drylands and deserts, the Mediterranean and polar regions, and an atlas presenting impacts and risks from global to regional scales.

Our event today will follow the structure of the Summary for Policymakers, with sections on observed and projected impacts and risks, adaptation measures and enabling conditions, and climate-resilient development.

You will shortly hear the detail from IPCC co-chairs and authors who prepared the report. But let me summarize the key findings:

The cumulative scientific evidence is unequivocal: climate change is a grave and mounting threat to human wellbeing and the health of the planet. Any further delay in concerted global action will miss a brief and rapidly closing window to secure a liveable future.

We are not on track to achieve a climate-resilient sustainable world.

This report is a dire warning about the consequences of inaction. Our actions today will shape how people adapt and nature responds to increasing climate risks.

And as you will hear, climate change is intersecting with a number of other challenges including biodiversity loss and inequity to increase threats to ecosystems and people.

The report shows that exceeding warming of 1.5ºC, even temporarily, will result in additional severe impacts, some of which are irreversible.

Urgent action is required to adapt to climate change at the same as making rapid deep cuts in greenhouse gas emissions.

Before, we invite  Working Group II Vice-Chair Joy Pereira and Co-Chair Hans-Otto Pörtner to begin the presentation we will see the Working Group II report video. I look forward to our discussion.

Thank you.

GENEVA, June 6 – The schedule for the Synthesis Report, the final installment of the Sixth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), is expected to be revised for operational reasons.

It is anticipated that the Synthesis Report, which was scheduled to be released in early October 2022, will be rescheduled for release in late 2022 or early 2023.    

Exact changes to the schedule are to be considered by the IPCC and announced in a due course.

The Synthesis Report follows the release of three major reports over the past 10 months – the three Working Group contributions to the Sixth Assessment Report – despite the challenges to the work programme raised by the Covid-19 pandemic.

The Synthesis Report will integrate the findings of the three Working Group assessments as well as the three Special Reports released earlier in the cycle in 2018 and 2019 to provide policymakers with a high-level, up-to-date understanding of climate change, its impacts and future risks, and options for addressing it.

For more information contact:

IPCC Press Office, Email: ipcc-media@wmo.int
Andrej Mahecic, +41 22 730 8516 or Werani Zabula, +41 22 730 8120

Notes for Editors

About the IPCC

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is the UN body for assessing the science related to climate change. It was established by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in 1988 to provide political leaders with periodic scientific assessments concerning climate change, its implications and risks, as well as to put forward adaptation and mitigation strategies. In the same year the UN General Assembly endorsed the action by the WMO and UNEP in jointly establishing the IPCC. It has 195 member states.

Thousands of people from all over the world contribute to the work of the IPCC. For the assessment reports, experts volunteer their time as IPCC authors to assess the thousands of scientific papers published each year to provide a comprehensive summary of what is known about the drivers of climate change, its impacts and future risks, and how adaptation and mitigation can reduce those risks.

The IPCC has three working groups: Working Group I, dealing with the physical science basis of climate change; Working Group II, dealing with impacts, adaptation and vulnerability; and Working Group III, dealing with the mitigation of climate change. It also has a Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories that develops methodologies for measuring emissions and removals.

IPCC assessments provide governments, at all levels, with scientific information that they can use to develop climate policies. IPCC assessments are a key input into the international negotiations to tackle climate change. IPCC reports are drafted and reviewed in several stages, thus guaranteeing objectivity and transparency.

About the Sixth Assessment Cycle

Comprehensive scientific assessment reports are published every 6 to 7 years; the latest, the Fifth Assessment Report, was completed in 2014 and provided the main scientific input to the Paris Agreement. 

At its 41st Session in February 2015, the IPCC decided to produce a Sixth Assessment Report (AR6). At its 42nd Session in October 2015 it elected a new Bureau that would oversee the work on this report and Special Reports to be produced in the assessment cycle. At its 43rd Session in April 2016, it decided to produce three Special Reports, a Methodology Report and AR6. 

The Working Group I contribution to the Sixth Assessment Report Climate Change 2021: the Physical Science Basis was released on 9 August 2021. The Working Group II contribution, Climate Change 2022: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability, was released on 28 February 2022. The Working Group III contribution, Climate Change 2022: Mitigation of Climate Change, was released on 4 April 2022.

The IPCC is currently working on the final installment to the Sixth Assessment Report, the Synthesis Report, which will integrate the findings of the three Working Group assessments as well as the three Special Reports released in 2018 and 2019.

Global Warming of 1.5°C, an IPCC special report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways, in the context of strengthening the global response to the threat of climate change, sustainable development, and efforts to eradicate poverty was launched in October 2018.

Climate Change and Land, an IPCC special report on climate change, desertification, land degradation, sustainable land management, food security, and greenhouse gas fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems was launched in August 2019, and the Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate was released in September 2019.

In May 2019 the IPCC released the 2019 Refinement to the 2006 IPCC Guidelines on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories, an update to the methodology used by governments to estimate their greenhouse gas emissions and removals. 

For more information visit www.ipcc.ch.

The website includes outreach materials including videos about the IPCC and video recordings from outreach events conducted as webinars or live-streamed events.

Most videos published by the IPCC can be found on our YouTube channel

GENEVA, June 3 – The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) will be taking part in the Bonn Climate Conference or the 56th session of the Subsidiary Bodies of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) from 6 to 16 June 2022.   

The IPCC Secretary Abdallah Mokssit will deliver a statement on behalf of the IPCC at the opening of the 56th Session of the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice (SBSTA) on 6 June. From 14.00 pm that afternoon, the Co-Chairs, and authors of the IPCC Working Group II will be presenting the findings from the report Climate Change 2022: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability at a SBSTA-IPCC special event.  On 8 June 2022, the IPCC Working Group III Co-Chairs and authors will present the findings from the report Climate Change 2022: Mitigation of Climate Change at a similar event. Both special events will be opened by the Chair of the IPCC Hoesung Lee.

On the morning of 7 June, IPCC experts will be presenting and taking part in an event on the Global Goal on Adaptation. From 16.00 on 7 and 8 June, IPCC will participate in the Structured Expert Dialogue, where the findings of the Working Group II and III contributions to the Sixth Assessment Report will be the main input to the discussions.

At 11.30 am on 8 June, the IPCC Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories (TFI) will hold a side event with UNFCCC on The Next Generation of the IPCC Inventory Software: A key tool to support the Enhanced Transparency Framework Implementation under the Paris Agreement. 

Experts of the three IPCC Working Groups that developed the latest Sixth Assessment Report trilogy (the Physical Science Basis, Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability and Mitigation of Climate Change) will provide input to the Research Dialogue on 9 June.

From the afternoon of 9 June till 14 June, the UNFCCC will host the very first Technical Dialogue on the Global Stocktake. The Global Stocktake is a process where the world’s governments would periodically take stock of the implementation of the Paris Agreement to assess their collective progress towards achieving the purpose of the Agreement and its long-term goals. The IPCC Chair will provide opening remarks and IPCC Co-Chairs and experts will be taking part in the various round tables over the duration of the Technical Dialogue.  

IPCC experts will also be taking part in various other side events and activities. The TFI will have a dedicated space providing an opportunity to learn about its activities, in particular the new generation of inventory software, and the work of the IPCC in general.  

Details on the events in this media advisory and other activities with IPCC involvement, including how to follow the relevant livestreams, will be shared here.

For interview requests, please email ipcc-media@wmo.int.

For more information contact:
IPCC Press Office, Email: ipcc-media@wmo.int
Andrej Mahecic, +41 22 730 8516 or Werani Zabula, +41 22 730 8120

Notes for Editors

About the IPCC

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is the UN body for assessing the science related to climate change. It was established by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in 1988 to provide political leaders with periodic scientific assessments concerning climate change, its implications and risks, as well as to put forward adaptation and mitigation strategies. In the same year the UN General Assembly endorsed the action by the WMO and UNEP in jointly establishing the IPCC. It has 195 member states.

Thousands of people from all over the world contribute to the work of the IPCC. For the assessment reports, experts volunteer their time as IPCC authors to assess the thousands of scientific papers published each year to provide a comprehensive summary of what is known about the drivers of climate change, its impacts and future risks, and how adaptation and mitigation can reduce those risks.

The IPCC has three working groups: Working Group I, dealing with the physical science basis of climate change; Working Group II, dealing with impacts, adaptation and vulnerability; and Working Group III, dealing with the mitigation of climate change. It also has a Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories that develops methodologies for measuring emissions and removals.

IPCC assessments provide governments, at all levels, with scientific information that they can use to develop climate policies. IPCC assessments are a key input into the international negotiations to tackle climate change. IPCC reports are drafted and reviewed in several stages, thus guaranteeing objectivity and transparency.

About the Sixth Assessment Cycle

Comprehensive scientific assessment reports are published every 6 to 7 years; the latest, the Fifth Assessment Report, was completed in 2014 and provided the main scientific input to the Paris Agreement. 

At its 41st Session in February 2015, the IPCC decided to produce a Sixth Assessment Report (AR6). At its 42nd Session in October 2015 it elected a new Bureau that would oversee the work on this report and Special Reports to be produced in the assessment cycle. At its 43rd Session in April 2016, it decided to produce three Special Reports, a Methodology Report and AR6. 

The Working Group I contribution to the Sixth Assessment Report Climate Change 2021: the Physical Science Basis was released on 9 August 2021. The Working Group II contribution, Climate Change 2022: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability, was released on 28 February 2022. The Working Group III contribution, Climate Change 2022: Mitigation of Climate Change, was released on 4 April 2022.

The  IPCC is currently working on the final installment to the Sixth Assessment Report, the  Synthesis Report, which will integrate the findings of the three Working Group assessments as well as the three Special Reports released in 2018 and 2019.

Global Warming of 1.5°C, an IPCC special report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways, in the context of strengthening the global response to the threat of climate change, sustainable development, and efforts to eradicate poverty was launched in October 2018.

Climate Change and Land, an IPCC special report on climate change, desertification, land degradation, sustainable land management, food security, and greenhouse gas fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems was launched in August 2019, and the Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate was released in September 2019.

In May 2019 the IPCC released the 2019 Refinement to the 2006 IPCC Guidelines on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories, an update to the methodology used by governments to estimate their greenhouse gas emissions and removals. 

For more information visit www.ipcc.ch.

The website includes outreach materials including videos about the IPCC and video recordings from outreach events conducted as webinars or live-streamed events.

Most videos published by the IPCC can be found on our YouTube channel.  

GENEVA, 23 May — TIME has named Panmao Zhai and Valérie Masson-Delmotte to this year’s TIME100 list, the magazine’s annual list of the 100 most influential people in the world. The full list and related tributes will appear in the June 6 / June 13 double issue of TIME, available here.

Valérie Masson-Delmotte and  Panmao Zhai are the Co-Chairs of the IPCC Working Group I for the latest IPCC cycle – the Sixth Assessment cycle. Most recently they have led the development the Working Group I contribution to the Sixth Assessment Report on the physical science basis of climate change. The IPCC Sixth Assessment Report comprises also of the contributions from Working Groups II and III and a Synthesis Report.

“This selection really highlights the increasing recognition and 
understanding of climate change around the world, and the importance 
of the IPCC’s recently issued three Working Group reports to inform policy,” said Panmao Zhai in reaction to the announcement. 

The Working Group I contribution to the Sixth Assessment Report on the physical science basis of climate change was released on 9 August 2021. The Working Group II contribution that looks at impacts, adaptation, and vulnerabilities was launched on 28 February this year. The Working Group III contribution on the mitigation of climate change was released on 4 April 2022. 

“I am very glad that Panmao and I, together, can give a face to their extraordinary work to assess and communicate the state of knowledge for our changing climate, related risks, and options for action,” added Masson-Delmotte. 

The TIME100 list, now in its nineteenth year, recognizes the impact, innovation and
achievement of the world’s most influential individuals.

Notes for Editors

About the IPCC

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is the UN body for assessing the science related to climate change. It was established by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in 1988 to provide political leaders with periodic scientific assessments concerning climate change, its implications and risks, as well as to put forward adaptation and mitigation strategies. In the same year the UN General Assembly endorsed the action by the WMO and UNEP in jointly establishing the IPCC. It has 195 member states.

Thousands of people from all over the world contribute to the work of the IPCC. For the assessment reports, experts  volunteer their time as IPCC authors to assess the thousands of scientific papers published each year to provide a comprehensive summary of what is known about the drivers of climate change, its impacts and future risks, and how adaptation and mitigation can reduce those risks.

The IPCC has three working groups: Working Group I, dealing with the physical science basis of climate change; Working Group II, dealing with impacts, adaptation and vulnerability; and Working Group III, dealing with the mitigation of climate change. It also has a Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories that develops methodologies for estimating emissions and removals of greenhouse gases.

IPCC assessments provide governments, at all levels, with scientific information that they can use to develop climate policies. IPCC assessments are a key input into the international negotiations to tackle climate change. IPCC reports are drafted and reviewed in several stages, thus guaranteeing objectivity and transparency.

GENEVA, May 5 – Former author of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Dr. Cynthia Rosenzweig, has been named the 2022 World Food Prize Laureate for her pioneering work in modeling the impact of climate change on food production. Awarded by the World Food Prize Foundation, the $250,000 prize recognizes Rosenzweig’s achievements as the founder of the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP). AgMIP is a globally integrated transdisciplinary network of climate and food system modelers. According to the announcement from the World Food Prize Foundation, AgMIP has directly helped decision-makers in more than 90 countries enhance their resilience to climate change.

“I am honoured to receive the World Food Prize this year, as food systems are emerging at the forefront of climate change action. Climate change cannot be restrained without attention to food system emissions, and food security for all cannot be provided without resilience to increasing climate extremes,” said Dr. Rosenzweig. “I salute the modelers around the world in AgMIP for their tireless work helping countries to achieve food security both now and in the future under changing climate conditions,” she added.

Cynthia Rosenzweig was one of the Coordinating Lead Authors of the food chapter on IPCC’s Special Report on Climate Change and Land. She has been involved in IPCC’s work since the First Assessment Report where she was a Contributing Author. She was a Lead Author on the Second and Third Assessment Reports, a Coordinating Lead Author on the Fourth Assessment Report and worked on that report’s Synthesis Report. She is currently a Senior Research Scientist at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and Adjunct Senior Research Scientist at the Columbia Climate School.

Barbara Stinson, President of the World Food Prize Foundation, announced the 2022 Laureate on 5 May during a ceremony hosted by the U.S. Department of State.  Rosenzweig will officially receive the World Food Prize at a ceremony in October 2022.